Updated Wilier Triestina Zero.7 announced

Still sub-800g but slightly stiffer and with more modern features

Wilier Triestina today announced a revamp of its ultralight Zero.7 road model.

The claimed weight for a medium frame is still around 750g, but updated tube shapes and some clever engineering have supposedly made it more efficient and easier to service, without affecting the previous model's excellent ride quality and handling characteristics.

Wilier triestina has updated its ultralight zero.7 model, maintaining a similar 750g claimed frame weight (medium size) but with additional stiffness and more modern features : wilier triestina has updated its ultralight zero.7 model, maintaining a similar 750g claimed frame weight (medium size) but with additional stiffness and more modern features
Wilier triestina has updated its ultralight zero.7 model, maintaining a similar 750g claimed frame weight (medium size) but with additional stiffness and more modern features : wilier triestina has updated its ultralight zero.7 model, maintaining a similar 750g claimed frame weight (medium size) but with additional stiffness and more modern features

The revamped Wilier Triestina Zero.7

While most bikes seem to get larger in terms tubing diameter with each iteration, Wilier Triestina's revamped Zero.7 has actually gotten noticeably smaller than before. According to Wilier, this reduces the volume of material required, thus decreasing weight. Wilier has, however, inflated the area around the bottom of the head tube, which now features a slightly dropped down tube that effectively wraps around the back of the fork crown.

This boosts the torsional rigidity of the front triangle by a claimed 14 percent, while upgrades to the frame's carbon fibre blend supposedly maintains similar stiffness levels elsewhere despite the smaller tubes, giving the new model a sleeker and more slimmed-down look.

The key structural upgrade to the wilier triestina zero.7 is the new dropped down tube, which effectively reinforces the lower head tube area for a claimed boost in front-end stiffness relative to the previous model: the key structural upgrade to the wilier triestina zero.7 is the new dropped down tube, which effectively reinforces the lower head tube area for a claimed boost in front-end stiffness relative to the previous model
The key structural upgrade to the wilier triestina zero.7 is the new dropped down tube, which effectively reinforces the lower head tube area for a claimed boost in front-end stiffness relative to the previous model: the key structural upgrade to the wilier triestina zero.7 is the new dropped down tube, which effectively reinforces the lower head tube area for a claimed boost in front-end stiffness relative to the previous model

Although the down tube is beefed up behind the head tube, the rest of the frame is slightly smaller than before

The new Zero.7 also has a convertible fully internal cable routing setup, borrowed from the Cento 1 SR. For mechanical drivetrains, cables enter the frame at the top of the down tube, just behind the head tube. From there, they take a straight path to the criss-crossed bottom bracket guide. The rear derailleur cable exits through the dedicated replaceable rear derailleur hanger.

Electronic drivetrains, on the other hand, use a different set of interchangeable bolt-on bits – along with a different entry point. In this case, the wire enters the frame through the same port as the rear brake cable for cleaner aesthetics while the down tube access point is then smoothly capped over.

A schematic of the newly internal mechanical cable routing on the revamped wilier triestina zero.7: a schematic of the newly internal mechanical cable routing on the revamped wilier triestina zero.7
A schematic of the newly internal mechanical cable routing on the revamped wilier triestina zero.7: a schematic of the newly internal mechanical cable routing on the revamped wilier triestina zero.7

The convertible cable routing is now fully internal

One thing that hasn't changed, is the enviably creamy ride quality. The small-diameter seat stays and fork blades, plus the newly downsized 27.2mm-diameter seatpost, likely contribute to this, but according to Wilier, the real key is the frame's SEI (Special Elastic Infiltrated) carbon composite frame construction, carried over from the original Zero.7.

According to Wilier, SEI intersperses layers of viscoelastic materials at select areas in the carbon fibre layup. In addition to providing better vibration damping, SEI is said to also improve the frame's long-term durability and impact strength.

Also making another appearance is the ultra-oversized – and widely compatible – BB386EVO bottom bracket design, tapered 1 1/8 to 1 1/4in steerer diameter, and carbon fibre dropouts.

The asymmetric chain stays are not only different in terms of height and width but they also take slightly different paths from bottom bracket shell to dropout: the asymmetric chain stays are not only different in terms of height and width but they also take slightly different paths from bottom bracket shell to dropout
The asymmetric chain stays are not only different in terms of height and width but they also take slightly different paths from bottom bracket shell to dropout: the asymmetric chain stays are not only different in terms of height and width but they also take slightly different paths from bottom bracket shell to dropout

Despite the lower half of the frame being well reinforced, Wilier Triestina claims the redesigned Zero.7 rides just as well as before

Wilier Triestina will offer the new Zero.7 in size sizes and four colour options – and not surprisingly, it's quite expensive. Retail price for the frameset is US$4,999 / €3,498; a full Shimano Dura-Ace build with Mavic Ksyrium SLR clinchers, FSA cockpit, Selle Italia saddle, and Ritchey carbon seatpost will cost US$9,499 / €6,998; and a similar setup but with Campagnolo Super Record will run US$10,499 / €7,598. UK pricing is still to be determined.

It's expected to be available from autumn.

Wilier triestina will offer the new zero.7 in four different colors: wilier triestina will offer the new zero.7 in four different colors
Wilier triestina will offer the new zero.7 in four different colors: wilier triestina will offer the new zero.7 in four different colors

The new Zero.7 will be available in four colour options

James Huang

Technical Editor, US
James started as a roadie in 1990 with his high school team but switched to dirt in 1994 and has enjoyed both ever since. Anything that comes through his hands is bound to be taken apart, and those hands still sometimes smell like fork oil even though he retired from shop life in 2007. He prefers manual over automatic, fizzy over still, and the right way over the easy way.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Up in the Colorado high-country where the singletrack is still single, the dirt is still brown, and the aspens are in full bloom. Also, those perfect stretches of pavement where the road snakes across the mountainside like an artist's paintbrush.
  • Beer of Choice: Mexican Coke
  • Location: Boulder, Colorado, USA
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