In case of emergency: Do you ever cycle alone?

Do you have difficulty remembering phone numbers? More importantly, how would someone know who to phone if you were unconscious or in urgent medical need?

Do you ever cycle alone? Do you have difficulty remembering phone numbers? More importantly, how would someone know who to phone if you were unconscious or in urgent medical need? 

This may be old news to some of you.  But for the rest of us, here are some top tips:

A canny Paramedic suggested that people put I.C.E (In Case of Emergency) next to their next of kin’s name.  This way, they could find the person, out of possibly hundreds in your mobile phone’s contact list, who may know how to save your life.  That is, if you’ve remembered to take your phone with you, and have charged up the battery.

Always tell a loved one or friend where you are going, and who to contact for exact knowledge of the trail if you fail to return in reasonable time.

Carry a whistle and a first aid kit – they’re relatively cheap and may be the difference between a lonely night on the moors or even life and death.  Warm clothes and a space blanket are also worth considering if you are going to remote areas. 

Make sure you can get a signal on your mobile phone when traversing your favourite trails.  If you can’t, find a mobile phone provider which does cover it.

Getting a waterproof solution for your mobile phone is also a good idea.

Make sure you can easily reach your phone, whistle and first aid kit (all redundant if you put them in a back pack and break your back) – this is where side and front pockets in shorts and tops come in useful, as does the design of Wingnut hydration packs.

Make sure you know all the functions on your mobile phone – some have flashing light distress signals, and most have voice activated dialling. 

Got any other useful tips?   Please post them here.

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