Perception

We often initially feel moderate repulsion by slight changes to what we are used to. That is, until we get used to the perception change, and yesterday’s norm is what repulses us instead, so says Marcus Farley

My dad hit the nail on the head with a cracking example from the motor industry. I had told him that when I first saw the new Audi front radiator grills I thought that they looked weird, cumbersome and overbearing in comparison to the existing smaller and sleeker version. My dad explained that it was all about perception. We hadn’t got used to them yet, so they looked weird. 

But now we have got used to them, it’s the old versions instead that now look weird. To use another example, I saw an original Land Rover Discovery the other day. It was a vehicle that I craved when I first got into mountain biking all those years ago. But the thing looks like two conjoined oblongs now, compared to the more rounded edges of more modern cars.

This is a good point to introduce my hatred of white objects! But first, I need to qualify this remark. I have a white Peugeot 206. I bought it in 2003 as a work car and run around. It serves its purpose well, being both economical to run and relatively cheap to fix. At the time, I got some money knocked off the price because of its colour. That’s right, no-one wanted a white car so I got a reduction on it!

Every time I walk towards it, or sit in it (more times than I do most things unfortunately!) I go through the same thought: It’s white, it’s horribly white, why on earth did I get it! I even purposely don’t look after it, as I’ve always thought that I’d never be able to sell it on.

But since the revolution that is the I-Pod, my car is suddenly ‘cool.’ There are new white cars everywhere, Mercedez Benzs, BMWs, even Audis with big front grills all resplendent in white.

This love of white has trickled down into the bicycle industry, too. Journalists and punters alike are declaring their love for all things white.

When I first saw pictures of the new Yeti ASR Carbon, I winced when I saw that it had a half white frame with white fox forks. It made me feel slightly ill looking at it. But recently, I was lucky enough to be the third person in the country to get to ride it (after Steve Worland and Stu from the Yeti UK importers). And, guess what? in the flesh the bike looks like a work of art. The frame’s turquoise and white colour scheme with white forks looks amazing!.

What did my dad say about perception?

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