Very overweight - where can i start?

Get fit for riding.
joolsabel
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2013 16:57 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby joolsabel » Thu Apr 04, 2013 08:07 am

Hey Tony,

just sent you an email - I live in Rossendale too.

Jools

dalesteyn
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat May 25, 2013 08:42 am

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby dalesteyn » Sat May 25, 2013 08:48 am

Stretching for fitness flexibility is one of the most overlooked and underestimated parameters of physical fitness. The right stretches and stretching exercises can improve flexibility almost immediately, resulting in reduced aches & pains and increased energy. http://www.foodandfit.info/is-too-much- ... d-for-you/

mmacavity
Posts: 781
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:16 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby mmacavity » Tue Jul 02, 2013 11:20 am


lucilledonaldson
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 13:56 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby lucilledonaldson » Thu Jul 04, 2013 14:34 pm

It seems you've already get the ball rollin. To start is the hardest part. Once you get started and like it, it would be easy and fun :) Have you lose some of your weight?

BigAirNig
Posts: 278
Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 16:52 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby BigAirNig » Thu Sep 05, 2013 15:27 pm

Get the book by Gary Taubes > Why we get fat and what to do about it

It's excellent!

Also - The art and science of low carbohydrate performance.

Will totally change how you think about what you eat and what it does to the body and how it stores fat.

Each book is on Amazon for about £8 I think.
Rocky Mountain Altitude 50 (+ upgrades.....!)

pushingnatural
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 15:24 pm
Contact:

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby pushingnatural » Fri Feb 20, 2015 07:47 am

Lancstony wrote:Evening all, I'm a man in need of help!! I am currently 20 stone and growing as I am eating like a horse at the moment, is so depressing its unreal, I keep trying to be good and stick to a diet but I am finding it very hard, I know it isn't easy and there are no quick fixes and is up to me to change, just really struggling at moment.
Bought myself a Ribble winter bike last year and not been out on it yet, feel like I can't do it and will just embarrass myself, but I have to do it to get sorted.

A lad I know passed away aged 40 last year, his lifestyle was like mine and it scares the hell out of me as I'm only three years under that now and not in good shape.

Is there any tips out there that may help me? I know at end of day is up to me to do it but I just can't seem to find the willpower!! I gave up smoking years ago and I think that was easier than dieting!!!

Anyway any tips greatly appreciated :oops:


Give up the mindset of a "diet", instead try an incorporate healthy eating into your lifestyle. By making a few fundamental changes to your eating habits, ones that underpin a healthy lifestyle, you can then progress on to refining and specifying the way you eat for optimal weight loss, muscle gain.etc

First things first, remove all processed foods, limit refined carbohydrates and ensure you're eating enough vegetables. A few simple rules to help you follow this are:
1) If you look at the back and it's got more than 3 ingredients, it's probably not good for you.
2) Aim for around half your plate to be vegetables, a quarter protein and a quarter carbohydrate.
3) Avoid high sugar foods such as fruit juices, energy drinks and sweets.

By eating this way you shouldn't need to binge on unhealthy foods or relapse once a week into a "cheat day", as many people do, as you can satisfy all your cravings through natural foods.

Once you've become comfortable with eating this way you can begin to start playing around with macronutrient ratios and calorie deficits, but until then you're much better off taking this approach as it lays a basis for any future dietary choices.
Diet advice for endurance athletes - www.pushingnatural.com

mattyfez
Posts: 238
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2014 10:00 am

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby mattyfez » Fri Feb 20, 2015 16:13 pm

I agree with all the above, small steps for diet or it won't last.
I started really simply by only eating proper meat, no processed meat, having a good portion of veg with everything, and substituting things like biscuits and crisps with nuts and fruit.

I have a sweet tooth so I'm still guilty of destroying a packet of jaffa cakes now and then, but on balance it's not so bad.

Also seasoning things with various spices rather than salt ketchup and mayo.

RutlandGav
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 18:21 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby RutlandGav » Mon Apr 06, 2015 15:26 pm

Since my 20th birdthday i've always been active, but still somewhat overweight. Looking back, my biggest mistake was not to appreciate that weight management is a long term game. I'd do a few long rides, or crash diet for a week, see 9lb come off really fast, then divert some of the effort to another area of my life, fall off the wagon , and gain it all back again in days.

Re: crash dieting. Part of that is i'm a constant craver type, if food is near me i'm always tempted by it, yet after 20 hours without food i go into ketosis and feel paradoxically little appetite - but i'm too flakey and light headed to actually work, so it's something i used to do on holidays.

The other thing i didn't realise was that none of that weight loss was actually real. I might have lost 1 or 2 lb of fat, but most of it was.. food mass, no longer present in digestive tract, glycogen (1lb), the water that attaches itself to glycogen (3lb), the water that attaches to the sodium content of my normal diet (3lb), and lean body tissue - probably lost as much of this as fat.

Obviously one or two normal meals + rehydrating puts all of the water, fibre and gylcogen weight back... and i'd begin to beleive that dieting was futile, since i'd gain everything back in one day.

From around 2008 to 2011 I had a major bout of depression and stopped exercising, I just thought my weight would find its own level since i never succeeded in any diet anyway. Wrong. In 2011, when i finally sought treatment for the depression, i was up from 13st to 18st . Time to get back on it.

I spent a couple of years going to the gym 10 hours a week. David Lloyd seems really extravagant on my wages, but on the upside it's considerably more luxurious and comfortable at the gym than it is at my house, so I didn't mind being there. I was there a lot, watching films on my tablet, boxed sets, premier league football on sky sports, listening to friday/saturday night dj sets. 10 hours a week on the crosstrainer or therabouts. It helped that i didn't live too far from the place and used to pass it on the way home. This got me down to 15 and a half stone over 2 years.

Then I had to move house and i'm no longer near my gym. It's now the opposite direction to my work commute and i was too busy at first to keep up - once i stopped, it was hard to go again somehow. So I missed out on exercise for 7 months. Given my previous experience with diets, i was fully expecting to have put ALL of the weight back on by this point. In fact, because it was real weight loss, I'd only gained a few pounds and was still under sixteen stone.

Two months ago I started bike commuting to work, something i did between 1998 and 2008. The journey's somewhat daunting - 16 miles each way, and i do 12 hour shifts, 4 on 4 off. I started out alternating between driving and biking. Now i bike three out of 4, and cross train a bit on my days off. I may simply have to move closer to work to actually do it all 4 days however - i'm just not getting enough time to sleep, even if i go directly to bed when i get in.

Anyway, I only started weighing myself again on 18th march. During those 4 days off my weight fluctuated between 97 and 95.5kg . Over the current block of 4 days off , my weight has fluctuated from 96-93.5kg. Coming down steadily.

My eating habits have shifted gradually over the years.

First thing to go was the fast food. Then the cakes and pizzas. Cheese has cut down drastically. I've had it once this year - jacket potato topped with cheese as well as beans. naughty! Crisps are cut right down, and i now only eat low fat ones.

Since cycling to work hower, i've really found it easier to avoid fatty food, it simply no longer appeals. I want my carbs unsullied by contaminants ! I find myself eating chocolate flavour low fat yoghurts with sweetners, or skimmed milk chocolate drinks, in place of actual chocolate. Low fat yoghurts are in fact my #1 fix whenever i get a craving for anything sweet in fact.

And since taking up loads of cycling, i've gotten into fruit in a big way. I was never an apples, bananas or oranges person. But grapes and pineapple chunks are great - and you can't really overeat on them i've discovered. Also strawberries with low fat rice pudding - a nice healthy recovery dessert!

The main thing i've found though, with using exercise to acheive weight loss, is to be mindful of your glycogen reserves. You can only store 800 calories worth and most of the energy in exercise comes from glycogen. If you run out on a ride, you suffer a catastrophic loss of energy and will come home with incredible food cravings, which is really dangerous. OTOH, you never want to allow the glycogen reserves to become completely filled either. Once this happens, any additional carbohydrate you eat gets turned to fat. Your body runs on fat when it isn't exercising - if you eat a low fat diet, and never allow your carb reserves to get overfilled, you can only get thinner.

In practical terms this means spreading the exercise out as good as possible through the week. An hour ride before the evening meal every day will work well, even better is a twice daily ride (cycle commuting). There is a danger that if you ride to the point where your body carbohydrate reserves deplete, that you're going to be ravenous on arrival and prepare huge portions, or ring up Pizza Hut and order 4 different kinds of pizza. It's less likely if your missus sticks a plate under your nose the moment you step through the door. Single bikers (or those whose partners expend their talents outside the kitchen) can get around the problem by packing a milkshake , sports drink or bottle of fruit juice on the bike. Glug it 5 minutes from home. By the time you've parked up and showered, it should be kicking in and bringing your blood sugar back to normal, and you'll suddenly realise you don't actually need that three course indian meal you've been fantasising about the last 10 miles after all, and sit down with your Pasta and Box set of Ice Road Truckers as planned. Lisa Kelly :D :oops: :D

GLOYT
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2015 17:17 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby GLOYT » Mon Apr 06, 2015 16:23 pm

some interesting idea's for me to try in here, sound's easy when you think about it, less in more movement job sorted, just need to put it into practise to get me custard cream reserve's going

mmacavity
Posts: 781
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:16 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby mmacavity » Thu Oct 15, 2015 16:24 pm

Kitchen Café on BBC Radio Scotland talking about sugar

Starts at about 2:00 in
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06gwwrr


mmacavity
Posts: 781
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:16 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby mmacavity » Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:31 am

BBC Radio 4 TheReport

"Salad v Surgery: Treating Type 2 Diabetes
Once a purely cosmetic procedure, bariatric surgery procedures like this have been described as the greatest advance in the history of treatment of Type 2 diabetes - so why aren't more patients being treated in this way?

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE), which provides guidance and advice to the NHS, has said obese patients with diabetes should be rapidly assessed for surgery - but that's yet to happen.

The treatment has been met with fierce criticism, especially from the tabloid press, which declared it undeserved: fat people should just stop eating instead of using up valuable resources to pay for vanity operations.

Furthermore, Britain's leading diabetes charity, Diabetes UK, has also warned of the 'serious risks' posed by the procedure - even though the NHS has itself stated it is not more risky than a routine gall bladder operation.

The irony here is that increasing the number of bariatric procedures could actually save the NHS millions of pounds, as patients are weaned off costly diabetes drugs - the NHS currently spends around £12bn a year treating the disease.

With round 700 people diagnosed with diabetes in Britain every day, are we letting misguided morality get in the way of an opportunity to save money - and lives?"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06j5qdf#play

Bikey Bazaar
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:12 am
Contact:

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby Bikey Bazaar » Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:30 am

No matter how unfit you are, it is never too late to ride a bike. It certainly helped me a lot. The bikes with wide tires should be helpful though.

mmacavity
Posts: 781
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:16 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby mmacavity » Sun Nov 01, 2015 17:54 pm

BBC Radio 4
"A Fat Lot of Good

Food Programme

The range of fats and oils available to us is growing but the advice has changed dramatically. Sheila Dillon looks to cut through the latest thinking to help gain clarity of which we should be using when.

She's joined in the studio by Dr Michael Mosley whose recent investigation looked into how the composition of saturated and polyunsaturated fats changed when heated with food and resulted in the the production of dangerous aldehydes. Sheila finds out what response there has been since the programme and how he's changed his own cooking and buying habits but what questions should we be asking when we eat out?"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06ltb5d#play

www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29616418

motorifuoribordo
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 08:12 am
Contact:

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby motorifuoribordo » Tue Nov 10, 2015 08:14 am

Who can help also me?

brianbee
Posts: 329
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 16:08 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby brianbee » Tue Nov 10, 2015 14:14 pm

motorifuoribordo wrote:Who can help also me?


What help do you require ?

JimDavies
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2015 12:02 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby JimDavies » Wed Nov 25, 2015 14:31 pm

I've always struggled to lose weight (I'm pretty skinny, but am greedy!) and the only thing which has ever worked for me is cutting out carbs and foods with sugars in them.. do that 6 days a week, with a few cheat meals on the 7th and you should find the weight will fall off..

brianbee
Posts: 329
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 16:08 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby brianbee » Wed Nov 25, 2015 16:53 pm

JimDavies wrote:I've always struggled to lose weight (I'm pretty skinny, but am greedy!) and the only thing which has ever worked for me is cutting out carbs and foods with sugars in them.. do that 6 days a week, with a few cheat meals on the 7th and you should find the weight will fall off..


Yes it will probably cause you to lose weight, but will rob you of an important energy source. Im not sure living in near permanent ketosis is a good thing ?

Alex99
Posts: 325
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2015 16:46 pm

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby Alex99 » Tue Jan 19, 2016 11:48 am

JimDavies wrote:I've always struggled to lose weight (I'm pretty skinny, but am greedy!) and the only thing which has ever worked for me is cutting out carbs and foods with sugars in them.. do that 6 days a week, with a few cheat meals on the 7th and you should find the weight will fall off..


How do you keep active with no carbs? Isn't that like having the knock all the time?

keef66
Posts: 8737
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 09:46 am

Re: Very overweight - where can i start?

Postby keef66 » Tue Jan 19, 2016 12:51 pm

I've never been massively fat, but from my mid 50s I slowly started to accumulate a bit more around my middle, and almost certainly a lot of visceral fat. At only 5'6" when I got to 11stone 4 lbs I was bordering on overweight.

I tried calorie counting all the time and trying to reduce fat intake, but I get bored quickly, and often over eat carbs because low fat food is so unsatisfying. And now saturated fat is no longer on the naughty step, and carbs (sugar / fructose in particular) in the spotlight instead, it seems I was doing myself no favours.

Now I just try to eat as many different things as I can; a balanced diet including fish and vegetables, prepared from fresh ingredients whenever possible, and in sensible portions. I try to get out on the bike 3 times a week, and 2 days a week I fast, eating just 600 calories in the evening.

This enabled me to shift 18 pounds of excess weight, and more importantly has improved my blood lipid profile so the GP is no longer threatening me with statins / fibrates.

Fasting on 2 non consecutive days (many people choose Mondays and Thursdays) makes it easier because you know you can eat normally the next day, and Fri / Sat / Sun are unaffected too.


Return to “Health, Fitness & Training”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest