Seven Deadly Sins

Talk about competitive road cycling in all its forms
Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:26 am

ShinyHelmut wrote:If you like climbing books then have a look at "psychovertical" by Andy Kirkpatrick. Andy Cave's "Learning to Breathe" is also very good.

There is a very good reason the premiere mountaineering literary prize is the Boardman Tasker, I have a hardback compendium of their books which is well worth reading, sadly they are no longer with us.

As Garry H says "The White Spider" is also compulsory reading.

I have many more books on the mountaineering shelf of my bookcase than the cycling one!


Would also have recommended the books by the two Andy's,escpecially Learning to Breathe. Any of Joe Simpson's books are well worth a read, especially "This game of ghosts", which i prefer to Touching the Void. Joe Brown's "The hard years" is also worth a read. As Shinyhelmut alluded to, there are far too many good books to recommend.

frenchfighter wrote:I've watched Touching the Void and found it superb and can appreciate the skill to climb (a guy at work has climbed Everest). I dislike what it has turned into though through its commericalisation and apparent ease with which nobodies are able to climb at least part way up Everest.


Wouldn't say that anybody has ascended Everest with "apparent ease", but I agree with the gist of your viewpoint. To me,mountaineering and climbing was/is all about self-sufficiency and having to live by your own decisions,quite literally in some cases. Not paying someone something in the region of 20-30k to lay a trail of ropes up a mountain and to have all your gear carried up by Sherpas. A cycling analogy would probably be comparing US Postal/Sky's tactics to that of a Pantani or Contador, but I won't get into that...

Another thing common between the two sports is the obsession with lightweight gear andstrength to weight ratios :lol:

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frenchfighter
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby frenchfighter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 13:37 pm

Garry H wrote:To me,mountaineering and climbing was/is all about self-sufficiency and having to live by your own decisions,quite literally in some cases. Not paying someone something in the region of 20-30k to lay a trail of ropes up a mountain and to have all your gear carried up by Sherpas.


Precisely this.

If mountaineering would appeal to me more it would be due to the aspects of human suffering/endurance/fortitude/courage etc which I would admire (much like in cycling) rather than the actual who/what/how of climbing a mountain.
Contador is the Greatest

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frenchfighter
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby frenchfighter » Mon Dec 24, 2012 13:42 pm

Books recommended on this thread:

Into the Silence
Mad,Bad and Dangerous
The Climb
The White Spider
Touching the Void
Psychovertical
Learning to Breathe
This game of ghosts
The hard years
Contador is the Greatest

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ShinyHelmut
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby ShinyHelmut » Mon Dec 24, 2012 13:53 pm

Garry H wrote:Another thing common between the two sports is the obsession with lightweight gear and strength to weight ratios


and discussions of ethics :lol:

pat1cp
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby pat1cp » Mon Dec 24, 2012 13:58 pm

I didn't buy it on the basis that I assumed it would be excerpts from his previous books complete with a final chapter saying "told you so".

If it's not that I'll maybe give it a go.

Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 15:12 pm

ShinyHelmut wrote:
Garry H wrote:Another thing common between the two sports is the obsession with lightweight gear and strength to weight ratios


and discussions of ethics :lol:


Don't even start me onthat one :wink:

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iainf72
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby iainf72 » Mon Dec 24, 2012 15:21 pm

I'd add the Tomaz Humar book in there (while on the subject of people who polarise opinion)

Also, Annapuma by Herzog is very good
Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.

Bakunin
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Bakunin » Mon Dec 24, 2012 15:56 pm

Has anyone climbed anything of note?

Is that Hillary book worth a look?

Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:05 pm

Bakunin wrote:Has anyone climbed anything of note?

Is that Hillary book worth a look?


Define "of note".

Bakunin
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Bakunin » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:19 pm

Garry H wrote:
Bakunin wrote:Has anyone climbed anything of note?

Is that Hillary book worth a look?


Define "of note".


I'd rather not -- but any of the big 7?

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ShinyHelmut
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby ShinyHelmut » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:27 pm

I take it by "the big 7" you mean the highest on each continent?

If that is the case I have climbed one, but I don't really consider it a mountain "of note" by the standards we're talking here.

I've bagged a few peaks in the alps, all guided, and got HAPE in the Himalayas, which put paid to my climbing ambitions.

I do have a colleague at work who has summited Everest, and not as part of a commercial guided trip.

Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:29 pm

Do you mean the highest peaks on each continent? Then no. It's a rather arbitrary list anyway. Only three of the seven are really worth the effort,in my opinion anyway. Have climbed a few of the 4 thousanders in the Alps and a lot of Scottish winter routes.

Bakunin
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Bakunin » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:39 pm

Shiny -- how high up have you gone?

Garry -- which three?

Bakunin
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Bakunin » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:42 pm

What do you think of this guy -- Alex Honnold?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR1jwwagtaQ

Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 16:59 pm

Bakunin wrote:Shiny -- how high up have you gone?

Garry -- which three?


Everest, Aconcagua and Denali.

Depending on your definition of "Europe", I may have summited one,Mont Blanc.

Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 17:00 pm

Bakunin wrote:What do you think of this guy -- Alex Honnold?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR1jwwagtaQ


Not bad, but what's he done on granite? Sorry, in joke.

pat1cp
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby pat1cp » Mon Dec 24, 2012 17:03 pm

I thougt we were talking about a book.....

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ShinyHelmut
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby ShinyHelmut » Mon Dec 24, 2012 17:08 pm

Garry H wrote:Not bad, but what's he done on granite?
:lol:

Personally of the 7 I've summited Kili 5895m. I've also summited mt blanc and a few other alpine peaks. My one visit to the Himalayas I got sick and didn't make it above 5000m.

Garry H
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby Garry H » Mon Dec 24, 2012 17:09 pm

pat1cp wrote:I thougt we were talking about a book.....


We were but that's the internet for you...

Wasn't going to bother wit it to be honest, for the reasons you mentioned,but will probably give it a shot now.

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OCDuPalais
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Re: Seven Deadly Sins

Postby OCDuPalais » Mon Dec 24, 2012 17:24 pm

Climbed Baggy Point in North Devon. Shat meself.

I worked with Leo Houlding (at the time, the golden boy of British climbing) and his mates when he was coming back from a smashed bone in his foot whilst climbing in the Andes: I expected a load of monk-like characters who worshipped their bodies like a temple, etc, and were very serious in their singleminded approach to their passion (a bit like I imagined cyclists being)... Oh how I was wrong.

Another favourable comparison to cyclists is that it's a sport to some, a pastime to some, a means of getting from A-B for some and a way of life to some - and as others mentioned the power to weight thing is massively important (but at least the guys get to look like the conventional version of "real men" with a muscular upper body rather than the ridiculous bodies cyclists have).


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