The Logistics Of Cycling To Work And Wearing A Shirt and Tie

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Yellow Cliff
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Postby Yellow Cliff » Wed Dec 05, 2007 14:33 pm

Most of the essentials are covered already so I will just mention two things
1) easy care shirts are great for carrying crease-free. Pure cotton is a nightmare.
2) ALWAYS have a full spare set of clothes in work (perhaps old stuff that would just "do" in an emergency). Just in case you forget to pack properly before your ride... or your pannier leaks.

Father Faff
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Postby Father Faff » Wed Dec 05, 2007 20:17 pm

My ride is 14 miles on-road or 13 miles off-road each way so yes it is well worth getting into the gear! Lycra as I'm of the old school. I would only wear my work clothes if it was just a few miles and even then I'd be concerned about getting my smart casual clothes sweaty and oily before I even got to work or even worse falling into a peat bog on the off-road route!

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nwallace
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Postby nwallace » Wed Dec 05, 2007 20:40 pm

Showers at work, and a tolerance of polo shirts.
Addidas trackie troosers and reasonable cycling top and base layer. Could probably get away without the shower at work but I save time at home by not bothering there.

Both my primary school and secondary school had showers........

mookboy
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Postby mookboy » Wed Dec 05, 2007 23:34 pm

Thanks for the responses.

We have got showers at school, but they are the open shared versions - the fear of a 12yr old walking in on me mid scrub brings me out in a cold sweat. I'm only 30 so hopefully I won't look too much of dong pedalling in - I'll probably be getting there too early for the bairns to see me anyway.

I'm going to give this a go with the trousers and shoes at school and the kecks and shirt in a bag on my back. Our department has a small office I can change in, and there is a lockable staff toilet with a sink just down the corridor. So it could work out fine. I'll have a look for some of these crease-proof shirts too. The packet of wipes is a genius idea too, thanks!

Cyclegent
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Postby Cyclegent » Thu Dec 06, 2007 09:51 am

My tip is DON'T cycle in a suit for more than a mile or so. The trousers wear through in about two weeks and you get hot as hell.

I keep three suits, two pairs of shoes and an overcoat at work - I've completely taken over the coatstand!

I bring a tie in rolled up and wear my work shirt on the bike, though I always wear a tee shirt underneath. Old cotton trousers and jacket on top. I also have an army-issue scrim-net scarf (you can get them from army surplus shops for about £4) which keeps out the wind and rain but also absorbs perspiration, and a flat cap to keep sun/rain off. Apparently I look like 'something out of the Spanish Civil War' according to my mother.

Hodger
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Postby Hodger » Thu Dec 06, 2007 10:11 am

I've commuted into various jobs over the years and I understand the predicament - only 2 jobs I had actually had proper showers though.
Items to leave at work:
Trousers
Shoes
5 prs of keks and socks
Selection of ties
Deodorant / aftershave / shaving gel / razor / toothbrush/toothpaste
Apart from the shoes, allthe above fit into a normal sized drawer under my desk
(if you have a shower)
Towel + shower gel.

Then all you need to do is worry about getting your lunch and shirt into a rucksack every day. Learn how to fold your shirt properly so that it doesn't crease and you'll be fine. I've even had 4 or 5 shirts folded up neatly in a drawer so they don't crease over the course of a week.

I commute in lycra so I can train after work straightaway. Just pile all the stuff under your desk or *top tip* take in a small clothes horse that will fit under your desk and hang all the stuff under there so it dries out during the course of the day.
I've walked through a busy open plan office in full lycra many times and no-one makes any sarcy comments - if you're brazen enough to do this, people pretend not to notice you and just keep their head down.

As for the bit about kids poking fun at you - they'd do that whether you rode in or not. You're a teacher so it's to be expected. Try and challenge their (parents) notions that everyone needs a car by commuting by bike, use it to your advantage

el_presidente
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Postby el_presidente » Thu Dec 06, 2007 10:42 am

Hodger wrote:...a small clothes horse ...


i.e. a clothes pony

Father Faff
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Postby Father Faff » Thu Dec 06, 2007 11:37 am

I think you need to get a decent very-expensive downhill bike, full face helmet, body-armour, etc so the kids don't laugh at you........

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Dirk Van Gently
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Postby Dirk Van Gently » Thu Dec 06, 2007 13:29 pm

Father Faff wrote:
I think you need to get a decent very-expensive downhill bike, full face helmet, body-armour, etc so the kids don't laugh at you........


It would be nicked :-D

Hope it all works out.
so that's one less car on the road, only about 14.999 million to go.
If you see the candle as flame, the meal is already cooked.
Photography, Google Earth, Route 30

MB Robster
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Postby MB Robster » Thu Dec 06, 2007 14:28 pm

The easiest way to do shirts is using a shirt service. For around £2 a shirt they're taken from your office, laundered and pressed and returned a day or 2 later. I take trousers and enough underwear for the week in on Monday, and take them home to clean on Friday. The rest of the week I can use a small saddle bag to carry around my emergency bike kit so no ruck sack. Sorted.

Got several sets of showers at work, so that solves that one. Acouple even give you a towel to use too.

Doesn't your PE teacher have somewhere to clean themselves? I can't believe a school only has showers for the pupils

el_presidente
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Postby el_presidente » Thu Dec 06, 2007 14:46 pm

MB Robster wrote:The easiest way to do shirts is using a shirt service. For around £2 a shirt they're taken from your office, laundered and pressed and returned a day or 2 later. I take trousers and enough underwear for the week in on Monday, and take them home to clean on Friday. The rest of the week I can use a small saddle bag to carry around my emergency bike kit so no ruck sack. Sorted.

Got several sets of showers at work, so that solves that one. Acouple even give you a towel to use too.

Doesn't your PE teacher have somewhere to clean themselves? I can't believe a school only has showers for the pupils


amen to that

tube fair saved per day = £4
shirt laundered per day = £2.50

balance to upgrade fund = £1.50 per day

surfgurl
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Postby surfgurl » Thu Dec 06, 2007 15:14 pm

I commute to work at school. I tend to take a change of clothes with me in my rucksack, although I am going to start leaving clothes and shoes in school.
I work in a boarding school, so there are plenty of showers, but I would not risk using them. I agree the thought of one of the kids walking in on you would be awful, not to mention potentially career wrecking.
As for the kids thinking you are a total loser. I have gained street cred. Particularly when I turn up covered in mud, sweating and out of breath. And some kid will see you in your cycling gear with cycling helmet and ask perfectly seriously "Did you cycle in today?"
Oh, it's not a problem in my school, but may be for you. Cycle parking. Don't put your bike with the kids' bikes. Someone will trash it just cos it's a bike or they will do it to spite you. Have a chat with the caretaker and find a quiet corner to hide it with a good lock.

NFMC
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Postby NFMC » Thu Dec 06, 2007 15:40 pm

One tip I'd give is to try and do anything but carry a rucksack. The swaet that these things guarantee is massive.

I find that I can get a rolled up shirt in the big back pocket of my cycling jacket. That works perfectly for me.

I'm much the same as above; suit and shoes stay in work and I bring in a shirt a day. If it falls nicely and I have to drive in for whatever reason I may bring a few shirts to hang up at work but I rarely remember.

I always remember to have a spare set of undies and socks here in case it starts to rain on the way in.

And how's this for skeggy? We have showers at work but I rarely use them anyway. After a seven-mile ride I just put fresh clothes on and that's it. I've asked my wife to have a good sniff and she assures me I'm not stinky so I keep going with it! Thank goodness the internet is anonymous!

chrisinnorfolk
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Postby chrisinnorfolk » Thu Dec 06, 2007 15:45 pm

Drive in once a week with 5 shirts, 1 pair trousers and 1 jumper. Trousers and jumper last a week. Shoes kept under my desk. Take used laundry home with me. I'm a sweaty bu$$er, but as long as cleanliness is maintained (ie shower every evening) hygiene is not an issue

Sailing7
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Postby Sailing7 » Thu Dec 06, 2007 16:00 pm

Commuted in London wearing lycra with all but shoes in pannier and just cooled down before getting changed into shirt and tie. Out here in the sticks I can get away with polo shirt in the office and I leave trousers and shoes there to, still full lycra on the bike...now got shower in office so can push harder in the mornings - going to crack 20mph average speed soon for the 13 mile trip.....

Old Holdie
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Postby Old Holdie » Thu Dec 06, 2007 19:38 pm

Hodger wrote:I've walked through a busy open plan office in full lycra many times and no-one makes any sarcy comments - if you're brazen enough to do this, people pretend not to notice you and just keep their head down.


I wish! People watching me go by and saying "C'mon Eddie!" (my name is Rich)
I'd like to think they were referring to Eddie Merckx, more likely Eddie Izzard!

Hodger
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Postby Hodger » Fri Dec 07, 2007 10:04 am

Old Holdie wrote:I wish! People watching me go by and saying "C'mon Eddie!" (my name is Rich)
I'd like to think they were referring to Eddie Merckx, more likely Eddie Izzard!


more likely Eddie The Eagle Edwards :wink:

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Bassjunkieuk
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Postby Bassjunkieuk » Fri Dec 14, 2007 15:08 pm

In my job I tend to end up moving around between various sites around London, but I'm usually based at one site long enough to get a pair of shoes and trousers in at the start of each stint! I managed to get a nice hydration backpack from Halfords for about £40 that also has a nice size rucksack section (which can be detatched and used separately to leave a rucksack and smaller hydration pack with limited space!I)

I normally leave the shoes and trousers onsite until I'm sent elsewhere and bring in a shirt each day. At some of the sites I have access to showers which usually means taking a train in on my first and last days there so I can get a towel in along with shoes and trousers! To make matters worse I also have to occasionally lug a laptop in to in which case I will generally use public transport!

As for the cycle clothing question I brought some proper cycling shorts a while back, and swear by them, they are so much more comfortable then shorts! which I currently wear under some old 3/4 length trousers. During the summer I'd just use them by themselves. For the upper body I'd normally wear a sleeveless t when it's warm and then change to t-shirt and finally long sleeve top as it gets colder. I'm now also wearing a lightweight jacket to keep the wind from freezing me to death to! Helpful as I can unzip it after I've ridden enough to warm up :-)

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ride_whenever
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Postby ride_whenever » Fri Dec 14, 2007 15:39 pm

When I was commuting (17 miles each way on my singlespeed) I work padded lyrca shorts, short sleeve top and a gilet in the winter/wet and dispensed with the gilet in summer. Good gloves were a must as well. I took a travel towel, which is a godsend as they are tiny and dry ridiculously quickly. Generally I try to wear as little as possible so minimise sweating then I towel off at work and switch to clean clothes that I usually take in with me.

My rucsack is one of the ones that sits away from your back and I find I don't really sweat with it if I keep my head down.

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prj45
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Re: The Logistics Of Cycling To Work And Wearing A Shirt and

Postby prj45 » Sun Dec 16, 2007 09:13 am

mookboy wrote:Thing is, being rather unfit, and therefore likely to sweat a bit I really am wondering how you people do it!


I keep everything at work, including washed and pressed shirts, shoes and trousers on a hanger. The only thing I don't keep at work are pants and socks; I don't know why.

I work in the City so its easy to get shirts washed and pressed (and can choose about 10 different dry cleaning shops near me). If I didn't have access to this service I guess I'd have to take a day off the bike every now and then to replenish pressed shirts.

In an emergency I do sometimes pack a folded shirt.

The only pain is the towel, which I have to dry at work, and I like big towels so I can't really transport them on the bike and end up swapping them out every 8 days or so with a commute by tube.

The shirt thing doesn't often work in the summer though when I can keep sweating for about 15 minutes after I've wound down, even after a cold shower.


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