"Essential" gear list on a budget

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Nancy Luger
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby Nancy Luger » Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:16 am

Best bib shorts i've had/got are Endura FS260. I find the standard ones are actually better than the 'Pro' version. They are very lovely. In fact so lovely I sometimes just wear them around the house.

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Kendal Black Drop
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby Kendal Black Drop » Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:41 pm

dai_t75 wrote:Think the helmet may be something I will buy in store after trying it on and feeling comfortable in it, even if it does cost me a bit more.


That is a very good idea. I went to my LBS and did this and found the comfiest one (for me) was also one of the cheapest.

dai_t75
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby dai_t75 » Tue Oct 16, 2012 20:49 pm

Just a quick update...

So I picked up my new bike today, the Triban 3. So far I am very pleased with the look and feel of the bike :)

I have tried and failed to upload a photo here to show you guys.. how do I go about doing it? I tried adding an attachment but that doesn't seem to work!

So here are my first impressions/queries:

I am a massive fan of the bib shorts... especially as the mrs hates them haha.

We went on a quick 8 mile run today and I really enjoyed it, luckily the weather was nice and sunny even though a bit nippy at times.

Just hoping you wouldn't mind answering my following questions:

- I have set the seat up myself by having a slight bend in my knee when the pedal is at the lowest position and it felt ok for the short run we had. However, the seat level is higher than the handlebar level.. is this normal/acceptable?

- When the chain is on the smallest front cog and smallet back cog there was a slight noise that seemed to me as if the chain was rubbing/banging (it was not constant) on the front de-railer (excuse the spelling). Is this normal? Is it easy enough to fix?

- What do you guys usually do with cattle grids? We came across 4 today! We walked around the first 3, but just went for it over the 4th as we saw another cyclist do it. Didn't seem too bad, but don't want to damage the bike in the long run.

Planning to head out on sunday for a nice run if the weather isn't torrential! Goonna try and set up my cleats/pedals sometime before then... wish me luck and thanks for the help.

Germcevoy
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby Germcevoy » Wed Oct 17, 2012 09:39 am

I get the rubbing on my Triban 3. I never have to use the small cog on the front though so no biggie. I have found the gears to be quite scratchy though in general and only after 2 weeks of use. They were silky smooth to start with but now have a habit of changing down themselves of I am putting in some effort or an uphill section. Very very annoying and it's nearly had my balls smashed on the frame once or twice when they have slipped when I am out of the seat.

I'm going to give the chain a good scrub and oil to see if that helps. If not then its going back. Probably an easy fix but the thing is only 6 weeks old with less than 300 miles on it.

logie48
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby logie48 » Wed Oct 17, 2012 10:14 am

Hi,

A newbie myself (infact yet to get on my new bike yet :) ). But having done a bit of reading myself I remember that cyclists don't use the smallest chain ring with the smallest sprocket on your cassette, and vice versa with large. Reason being; if you set up this configuration and look at the angle at which the chain is sitting from a top view, it doesn't sit very pretty and can cause wear and tear. The noise may be coming from your chain scrapping the large chain ring as it moves on the drive train, due to the angle it's subjected to.

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Il Principe
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby Il Principe » Wed Oct 17, 2012 11:05 am

dai_t75 wrote:
Wardster00 wrote:If you are riding over the winter (I presume that you are as over shoes are on your list) you may want to add arm and leg warmers to your list.

I've just bought some DHB shorts and they are good. For the £50 you have for shoes the new DHB R1 shoes would fit the bill. They look smart and get good reviews.

Enjoy your shopping trip!


Yeah, I will be. I was thinking the long sleeve underarmour might be enough for my arms. Again, might add leg warmers later. From past experience with various sports in the cold I know for a fact my hands and feet are the main problems, I will see how the arms and legs get on (they are usually ok though). Will check out the shoes thanks - how do cycling shoe sizes generally compare to normal trainers/shoes?


Don't forget that with cycling the windchill is worse as you are moving faster. So whilst you might be ok in shorts for footie, you'll want bib tights for the winter. Jacket wise, there's no such thing as waterproof and breathable. Get something with plenty of vents that is water resistant. The key is to buy kit that will still keep you warm even when wet.

Cattle grids - just go straight over them, you won't damage your bike. Just don't turn on them as they can be v slippery especially in the wet.

Sounds like your gears need indexing properly, a good shop will do this or you can learn yourself. For excellent maintainence tips Park Tool's website is your friend. There's also plenty of good advice on ebay. Just make sure you buy a proper degreaser and lube. Wet lube is best for wet/winter and dry for Summer. I've tried most and have settle on Fenwicks. Steer clear of GT85 and WD40.

Also consider a hat with ear covers (or a skullcap) to wear under your helmet. If you're going to ride all winter then you will get cold ears at some point!

Some of my kit is quite expensive so I use Halo sportswash which I buy from Wiggle. Let's me wash at 30 and kills all the nasties.

Have a look at Prendas for winter gloves and socks. I've heard lots of bad things about Sealskins. Prendas own winter range is fantastic value for money.

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Mikey41
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby Mikey41 » Wed Oct 17, 2012 19:54 pm

dai_t75 wrote:- I have set the seat up myself by having a slight bend in my knee when the pedal is at the lowest position and it felt ok for the short run we had. However, the seat level is higher than the handlebar level.. is this normal/acceptable?

Yes, that's completely normal for road bikes.

dai_t75 wrote:- When the chain is on the smallest front cog and smallet back cog there was a slight noise that seemed to me as if the chain was rubbing/banging (it was not constant) on the front de-railer (excuse the spelling). Is this normal? Is it easy enough to fix?

Yeah, you will get the chain rubbing when you do that. It's best to avoid having the chain on small-small and large-large because of that.

dai_t75 wrote:- What do you guys usually do with cattle grids? We came across 4 today! We walked around the first 3, but just went for it over the 4th as we saw another cyclist do it. Didn't seem too bad, but don't want to damage the bike in the long run.

Just ride over them, it won't hurt the bike. I ease up out of the saddle a touch though :)

@Germcevoy:
Sounds like the gear cable needs a tension adjustment, easy fix.
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lotus49
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby lotus49 » Thu Oct 18, 2012 10:33 am

dai_t75 wrote:- When the chain is on the smallest front cog and smallet back cog there was a slight noise that seemed to me as if the chain was rubbing/banging (it was not constant) on the front de-railer (excuse the spelling). Is this normal? Is it easy enough to fix?


This is an easy one, it is normal and that's why you shouldn't do that. The chain should run fairly straight so don't use big-big or small-small, it's unecessary as it will only duplicate another ratio and it will wear out your chain.

t4tomo
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby t4tomo » Thu Oct 18, 2012 13:07 pm

Germcevoy wrote: They were silky smooth to start with but now have a habit of changing down themselves of I am putting in some effort or an uphill section. Very very annoying and it's nearly had my balls smashed on the frame once or twice when they have slipped when I am out of the seat.


the cabnle stretches a bit as you run it in. Tighten it up a 1/4 turn or so on the litle cyclinder screw where the cable enters the rear derailleur.
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dai_t75
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby dai_t75 » Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:34 pm

Thanks for all the help guys, it's very much appreciated. Hopefully in a few months time I will be able to pass some wisdom on :wink:

Had a nightmare the other night trying to take off the standard pedals using a normal spanner... so i convinced the missus that I needed:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/lifeline-pedal-wrench/

So hopefully that will be waiting for me tonight and I can put my pedals on. Will then be spending some time holding onto the wall trying to clip in and out :D

Weather doesn't seem too bad this weekend so might try and get out twice if my legs are up to it.

dai_t75
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby dai_t75 » Fri Oct 19, 2012 17:40 pm

Arghh, I'm having a nightmare trying to get these pedals off.

Even using the above long handle spanner I can't shift them. Does anyone know if the triban 3 stock pedals can be removed? I swear it looks as if the pedals are welded to the arms??

Just so I have got it right... the right hand side pedal (i.e. the side with the chain/gears) is a 'normal' thread, and anti-clockwise turn should unscrew it and the reverse on the other side?

Thanks again.

dai_t75
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby dai_t75 » Fri Oct 19, 2012 18:32 pm

Nevermind, just needed to give it a bit of welly!

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wilo13
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Re: "Essential" gear list on a budget

Postby wilo13 » Sat Oct 20, 2012 14:50 pm

Il Principe wrote:
dai_t75 wrote:
Wardster00 wrote:If you are riding over the winter (I presume that you are as over shoes are on your list) you may want to add arm and leg warmers to your list.

I've just bought some DHB shorts and they are good. For the £50 you have for shoes the new DHB R1 shoes would fit the bill. They look smart and get good reviews.

Enjoy your shopping trip!


Yeah, I will be. I was thinking the long sleeve underarmour might be enough for my arms. Again, might add leg warmers later. From past experience with various sports in the cold I know for a fact my hands and feet are the main problems, I will see how the arms and legs get on (they are usually ok though). Will check out the shoes thanks - how do cycling shoe sizes generally compare to normal trainers/shoes?


Don't forget that with cycling the windchill is worse as you are moving faster. So whilst you might be ok in shorts for footie, you'll want bib tights for the winter. Jacket wise, there's no such thing as waterproof and breathable. Get something with plenty of vents that is water resistant. The key is to buy kit that will still keep you warm even when wet.

Cattle grids - just go straight over them, you won't damage your bike. Just don't turn on them as they can be v slippery especially in the wet.

Sounds like your gears need indexing properly, a good shop will do this or you can learn yourself. For excellent maintainence tips Park Tool's website is your friend. There's also plenty of good advice on ebay. Just make sure you buy a proper degreaser and lube. Wet lube is best for wet/winter and dry for Summer. I've tried most and have settle on Fenwicks. Steer clear of GT85 and WD40.

Also consider a hat with ear covers (or a skullcap) to wear under your helmet. If you're going to ride all winter then you will get cold ears at some point!

Some of my kit is quite expensive so I use Halo sportswash which I buy from Wiggle. Let's me wash at 30 and kills all the nasties.

Have a look at Prendas for winter gloves and socks. I've heard lots of bad things about Sealskins. Prendas own winter range is fantastic value for money.


As mentioned above, to keep your bike in good order get a good bike cleaner like muc off for general cleaning of the bike. Then get a decent degreaser (I use muc offs version) to get all the crap of your chain and cogs. You will also need a decent lube.I have found Fenwicks to be the best (Fenwick road stealth chain lube). Also if there isn't one already on your bike I would suggest you get a master chain link so you can easily take the chain off when cleaning it. Youtube this and there are loads of videos which will show you this.
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