getting both bikes the same

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radiation man
Posts: 271
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2008 17:41 pm

getting both bikes the same

Postby radiation man » Tue Nov 20, 2012 20:43 pm

i have 2 bikes 1 is harder on the knees then the other, if i put both bikes next to each other shouldnt the chainwheels be inline with each other and the seats inline and both the same height.

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NapoleonD
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 19:51 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby NapoleonD » Tue Nov 20, 2012 20:55 pm

Geometry differences mean that they can be different.
You need a tape measure and a spirit level.

Get the bike that is good-

Make sure that the floor is level, place the bike so the rear wheel is up against a wall so the bike is coming straight out.

Measure the distance from the wall to the middle of the crank spindle
Measure the distance from the wall to the front of the saddle
The difference between the two is the saddle setback.

Measure the distance from the centre of the crank to a point, say, 140mm in from the tip of your saddle.
This is your saddle height.

Use the same technique to transpose these measurements onto the other bike, using the saddle height and the saddle setback.
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radiation man
Posts: 271
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2008 17:41 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby radiation man » Tue Dec 18, 2012 21:58 pm

ive just done the measurements and will put them on here on weds night

MichaelW
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Joined: Thu May 15, 2003 11:09 am

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby MichaelW » Wed Dec 19, 2012 00:33 am

Bottom brackets can vary in height so to eliminate this variable, measure from the BB.
I like an {x,y} coordinate to measure saddle and bar position.
Mark with tape the x=0 on your top tube using a plumbline (heavy weight on a string)

My saddle index is the front of the nose and my bar index is the web of the hand location. Being Norfolk bred but not born, my web is distinct.

careful
Posts: 681
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 15:17 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby careful » Wed Dec 19, 2012 11:34 am

Measure the distance from the wall to the middle of the crank spindle
Measure the distance from the wall to the front of the saddle
The difference between the two is the saddle setback.


Thanks napoleonD. I have always used a plumbline but your method seems a lot less fiddly and less room for error.

radiation man
Posts: 271
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2008 17:41 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby radiation man » Wed Dec 19, 2012 21:27 pm

my measurements for both bikes are trek 1.5 54cm frame
back of seat to wall 42cm
front of seat to front of bars 50 and a half cm
wall to middle of pedal spindle 74cm
wall to front of chainwheel 84 and a half cm
wall to middle of crank 74 and a half cm
wall to front of saddle 69 and a half cm

trek 1.0 pilot 56 frame
41 and a half cm
50 and a half cm
75 cm
86 cm
76cm
69 cm
the trek 1.5 is the best ride the trek pilot 1.0 makes both my knees ache at the top

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NapoleonD
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 19:51 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby NapoleonD » Wed Dec 19, 2012 22:31 pm

You have 2cm bigger saddle setback on the pilot. move the saddle 2cm forward on the pilot.
You haven't done the other most important measurement - middle of crank to top of saddle 14cm in from tip.
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radiation man
Posts: 271
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2008 17:41 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby radiation man » Thu Dec 20, 2012 20:51 pm

the seats of both bikes are the same 172 and a half cms

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wardieboy
Posts: 212
Joined: Sat Aug 27, 2011 16:57 pm

Re: getting both bikes the same

Postby wardieboy » Sat Dec 22, 2012 13:44 pm

NapoleonD wrote:Geometry differences mean that they can be different.
You need a tape measure and a spirit level.

Get the bike that is good-

Make sure that the floor is level, place the bike so the rear wheel is up against a wall so the bike is coming straight out.

Measure the distance from the wall to the middle of the crank spindle
Measure the distance from the wall to the front of the saddle
The difference between the two is the saddle setback.

Measure the distance from the centre of the crank to a point, say, 140mm in from the tip of your saddle.
This is your saddle height.

Use the same technique to transpose these measurements onto the other bike, using the saddle height and the saddle setback.


Top tip Mr Nap, thanks! I've now been able to set up my turbo to match the road bike.
peddlingmadness wrote:Slightly off topic but, whilst waiting behind a horse box today the Horse Farted with a little follow through, missed my mouth thankfully, but my glasses were pebble dashed..


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