Why do time trial bikes have gears?

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BeaconRuth
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby BeaconRuth » Thu Dec 20, 2012 20:18 pm

danowat wrote:I've yet to ride a TT course that has caused me to change from a 53T chainring.....

You should try riding some REAL time trials then Dan........... such as this one: viewtopic.php?f=40041&t=12842173 I'd like to see you try to ride up Ankerdine in your 53. :lol:

Ruth

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SBezza
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby SBezza » Fri Dec 21, 2012 13:11 pm

danowat wrote:I've yet to ride a TT course that has caused me to change from a 53T chainring.....


You haven't lived yet then Danny, you ought to try BeaconRuth's LMTT, you will be changing out of the 53 then without a doubt.

Hardly any TT courses are flat in the UK, even the drag strip courses, I use virtually all my gears on the sprocket during the season. I will use the small ring maybe 1 or 2 events, but I ride hilly TT's as well.

danowat
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby danowat » Fri Dec 21, 2012 13:44 pm

Nah, I am too fat for hilly TT's, why do you think I TT in the first place!

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markos1963
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby markos1963 » Fri Dec 21, 2012 15:55 pm

I couldn't get up Ankerdine with a compact! :oops:

peejay78
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby peejay78 » Sat Dec 29, 2012 07:59 am

danowat wrote:Nah, I am too fat for hilly TT's, why do you think I TT in the first place!


hilly TTs are the best thing about the discipline. way way more interesting and challenging than DCs, with a much better sense of camaraderie amongst the 'sufferers'.

toasted whippet
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby toasted whippet » Sun Dec 30, 2012 17:50 pm

I have ridden fixed and geared TT's - I find that the fixed is better for going up hills - its the downhills that you need gears for (I can't pedal very fast)

Never used the inside ring on a TT - took it off once, and promptly dropped the chain 3 times in the next TT, so back on it went.

Plus riding out to the start, as someone said already.

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andy_wrx
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby andy_wrx » Thu Jan 17, 2013 14:32 pm

Ask the question on timetriallingforum.co.uk

There are a number of TT'ers there who are diehard on fixed gear (usu BIG fixed gear), reckon it's quicker than a cassette.

Obree was one when TT'ing domestically in the UK : set a record in the Tour of the Trossachs which was considered 'hilly' (for Scotland !)

I guess it will force you to push hard uphill to maintain cadence and hence speed, when having multiple gears could tempt you to drop down a gear or two and hence slow down. This uphill gain will more than make up for the speed you'd lose spinning downhill rather than being able to change up and push a bigger gear coming back the other way.

In hillclimbs, then assuming you have the gear right, the lower weight and no temptation to faff-about changing gears must make it quicker too.

For myself, I'm not a strong enough fixed rider to do it, I feel I need my gears although generally I don't use that many of them even on rolling, not dragstrip DC, courses.
I do run a 12-21 9sp cassette, with 1-tooth gaps apart from 19-21, and 55/42 chainrings : the 42 is there for getting over steeper hills on training rides, where I might struggle on 55-21

Zingzang
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby Zingzang » Sun Jan 20, 2013 21:17 pm

Pross wrote: It would also be hard to accelerate out of roundabouts etc. if you were on a 53 x 12 fixed gear and many club time triallists wouldn't fancy riding a smaller fixed gear.

I've never met any cyclist who would seriously consider riding a fixed 53x12.

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Pross
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby Pross » Mon Jan 21, 2013 14:03 pm

Zingzang wrote:
Pross wrote: It would also be hard to accelerate out of roundabouts etc. if you were on a 53 x 12 fixed gear and many club time triallists wouldn't fancy riding a smaller fixed gear.

I've never met any cyclist who would seriously consider riding a fixed 53x12.


Exactly and yet most testers will be using a gear of that size when riding a flat course hence the comment. A lot of time triallists would struggle to maintain the cadence required to use a sensible fixed gear ratio as the preference seems to be for mashing big gears.

Trev The Rev
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby Trev The Rev » Mon Jan 21, 2013 14:35 pm

Pross wrote:
Zingzang wrote:
Pross wrote: It would also be hard to accelerate out of roundabouts etc. if you were on a 53 x 12 fixed gear and many club time triallists wouldn't fancy riding a smaller fixed gear.

I've never met any cyclist who would seriously consider riding a fixed 53x12.


Exactly and yet most testers will be using a gear of that size when riding a flat course hence the comment. A lot of time triallists would struggle to maintain the cadence required to use a sensible fixed gear ratio as the preference seems to be for mashing big gears.


What sort of gear would Obree and Boardman have used when they rode fixed on the road?

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greasedscotsman
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby greasedscotsman » Mon Jan 21, 2013 15:41 pm

Trev The Rev wrote:What sort of gear would Obree and Boardman have used when they rode fixed on the road?


On a wet Saturday evening in 1993, Chris Boardman ( North Wirral Velo-Kodak ) shattered his own 25 mile competition record on 110" fixed. Riding on a revised version of the H25/13 course based on the A34 at Oxford, his plan was simple. Turn the110" gear at 102 rpm and he would do a 47. Chris being on top form during his build up to the hour record attempt looked rock steady and keeping his heart rate at around 180 bpm made the ride look effortless. Choosing a bike with fixed rather than gears resulted in a 30% reduction in weight, Chris was able to stay well on top of the gear and record a 45-57. After the ride Chris said he thought he would be unable to father anymore children after bouncing all over the saddle on the 2 mile downhill start. Personally I would tell Chris to stop moaning and try riding the medium gear.


http://www.fixedwheel.co.uk/fixedwheel%20records.htm

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Pross
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby Pross » Mon Jan 21, 2013 17:20 pm

Trev The Rev wrote:
Pross wrote:
Zingzang wrote:
Pross wrote: It would also be hard to accelerate out of roundabouts etc. if you were on a 53 x 12 fixed gear and many club time triallists wouldn't fancy riding a smaller fixed gear.

I've never met any cyclist who would seriously consider riding a fixed 53x12.


Exactly and yet most testers will be using a gear of that size when riding a flat course hence the comment. A lot of time triallists would struggle to maintain the cadence required to use a sensible fixed gear ratio as the preference seems to be for mashing big gears.


What sort of gear would Obree and Boardman have used when they rode fixed on the road?


Would you class those two as 'most testers'?

Trev The Rev
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby Trev The Rev » Mon Jan 21, 2013 19:20 pm

Pross wrote:
Trev The Rev wrote:
Pross wrote:
Zingzang wrote:
Pross wrote: It would also be hard to accelerate out of roundabouts etc. if you were on a 53 x 12 fixed gear and many club time triallists wouldn't fancy riding a smaller fixed gear.

I've never met any cyclist who would seriously consider riding a fixed 53x12.


Exactly and yet most testers will be using a gear of that size when riding a flat course hence the comment. A lot of time triallists would struggle to maintain the cadence required to use a sensible fixed gear ratio as the preference seems to be for mashing big gears.


What sort of gear would Obree and Boardman have used when they rode fixed on the road?


Would you class those two as 'most testers'?


Obviously not. I was just interested to know.

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cheaterkiller
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby cheaterkiller » Mon Jan 28, 2013 00:35 am

lotus49 wrote:Why do time trial bikes for flat time trial courses have gears?

As far as I see it, the only real purpose for gears is climbing or on a course where there is a lot of slowing down and speeding up, which seems to be unusual to say the least. I cannot see the advantage of having gears on a course that is basically flat. Can someone enlighten me?


WHY DO SHARKS HAVE TEETH?

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lotus49
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby lotus49 » Mon Jan 28, 2013 18:30 pm

cheaterkiller wrote:
lotus49 wrote:Why do time trial bikes for flat time trial courses have gears?


WHY DO SHARKS HAVE TEETH?

To catch hold of, and bite chunks out of their food but I don't think that's why TT bikes have gears.

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cheaterkiller
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Re: Why do time trial bikes have gears?

Postby cheaterkiller » Wed Jan 30, 2013 20:48 pm

The question was meant to be as stupid as the one about TT bikes having gears. TT bikes have gears to facilitate a more efficient cadence while also taking into account variable conditions.
Cycling IS NOT full of dopists! and motorsport isnt full of women drivers!


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