What Road Bike?

What bike and bike bits should you buy?
alfablue
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Postby alfablue » Thu Sep 25, 2008 20:42 pm

In my view £500 with a Tiagra groupset is very good value, most bikes at this price have Sora, Tiagra bikes usually costing upwards of £650.

As for pedals and shoes, the choices for clipless pedals (and that is the only way to go, IMHO) is really between SPD pedals (which are designed for mtb's but are fine for road bikes, and allow you to wear shoes that you can walk in) and dedicated road pedals - these provide possibly greater stiffness with the shoe, but generally you can't really walk in the shoes.

As a beginner I would recommend the SPD route, and buying double sided pedals. Shimano PD-M520 pedals are very good for the money and can be had for £15-£17 (try Highonbikes). Any SPD compatible shoe will do, Specialized are good, or for a good cheap one, the DHB shoe from Wiggle. This shoe/pedal combo should cost around £55 so no great issue if you graduate to road pedals and shoes in the future.

RobN20
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Postby RobN20 » Thu Sep 25, 2008 21:15 pm

Thanks for the quick reply. TBH, I'd prefer a shoe/pedal combo that would allow me to walk to work when commuting. What does SPD stand for by the way?

alfablue
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Postby alfablue » Thu Sep 25, 2008 21:38 pm

SPD stands for Shimano Pedalling Dynamics :lol:

They invented this type of pedal. There are other brands of SPD compatible pedals, but Shimano are still the best IMHO.

There are some other brands of non-SPD compatible mtb pedals that have similar advantages, such as Time Atac, Crank Brothers etc, but SPD's work very well, and are very good value (for the M520's - £14.95 from here).

They use cleats that have a 2 bolt fixing, and the shoes have a recess that takes the cleat so they are flush with the sole allowing you to walk on them. (With road shoes, which usually have a 3 bolt cleat, the cleat is proud of the sole so you end up walking, and skidding, on the cleat).

These DHB shoes are £33, you can see how the sole works, the rubber oval where the bolts are comes off to reveal the recess. They are suitable for touring, commuting, pubbing etc.

Image

You can get some that look more like conventional road shoes (although they still have walkable soles) like these

Image though as you get to the £45 mark there is plenty more choice.

I use Specialized Taho shoes, comfy, fine to walk in, not too obviously bike shoes, so pub friendly; and for foul weather and for touring I use Shimano MT90 boots - they are Gore-Tex lined, fully waterproof, and genuinely work as hiking boots as well as cycling shoes - when I go cycle touring / camping these are the only shoes I need to take. Not exactly slick though!

Image

(They are pricey but the 08 version is a bit cheaper than the 09 model).

I plan to get some more racy looking shoes to wear on my new road bike (Planet-X SL Pro), I don't think the boots are quite the right look!

RobN20
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Postby RobN20 » Fri Sep 26, 2008 07:28 am

Again, thanks for your help. I must admit these pedals look more like engine parts than pedals. Certainly nothing like the ones I was used to when I was a kid, (or my current pedals). I like the look of the red/white DHB's. Seems reasonable money too. How exactly do these shoes/pedals work? How do you connect/disconnect the shoe from the pedal!?

alfablue
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Postby alfablue » Fri Sep 26, 2008 09:36 am

To engage the pedals you just press down, to disengage you twist your heel outwards (or you can buy "multi-release" cleats that will release by pulling any way you like).

The pedals have an adjustable spring tension, when you start out you set this to the slackest so the pedals disengage most easily. When you get experience you may wish to tighten it.

The position of the cleat in the shoe is the key, there is some adjustment, you need to get it just under the ball of your foot, it can take a little experimentation, but when you get it right the pedals engage without even thinking about it (just happens when you pedal away), and they feel totally natural in use.

RobN20
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Postby RobN20 » Fri Sep 26, 2008 11:01 am

All I need to do know is try and get my company to buy into the DFT bike to work scheme. I work for Swissport at Stansted Airport, (handling co. for 80% or so of the airlines st Stansted, though I only work on the Ryanair side). I would have thought it might be good PR for companies like Swiisport/Ryanair to be seen to be offsetting their carbon footprint. Although I'm really only interested in getting a cheaper bike. Has anyone managed to do this. How did you go about it and how long did it take?

CarpetFitter
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Postby CarpetFitter » Mon Sep 29, 2008 17:52 pm

One more question before I make the plunge!

My local store only has a medium Giant SCR 3.0 left. I'm 5'11" and e-mailed them to see if this was ok. They said it was and that it's in line with Giant's size guide (5'4" to 5'11" inches or something like that). Silly question maybe but would it be better to try and fit somewhere that has a large aswell? Although I'm technically the right size for the medium, I don't want to have the wool pulled over my eyes by the shop because they have no large and just want to get rid of it.

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CanterburyTailwind
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Postby CanterburyTailwind » Tue Sep 30, 2008 09:28 am

Hi Carpetfitter

I think the shop is probably right...I've got an L and am 6', and feel that it fits me well. However, I've got a friend of roughly the same height who feels that his L is slightly too big. So it's a bit of a grey area, but I would say that an M would fit you fine. But do go along and sit on it, have a go it, see whether it feels comfortable, and that you're not too hunched over the frame.

bigjim
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Postby bigjim » Thu Oct 02, 2008 20:19 pm

Imagehttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3068/2907375767_ab609471bc_b.jpg

Or you could buy one of these for £50 to start you off like I did.

:D



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CanterburyTailwind
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Postby CanterburyTailwind » Mon Oct 06, 2008 09:34 am

Love the retro bling, Big Jim! Are those gold plated brake (and suicide) levers? Tasty...
It looks alot like the Dawes I had until the beginning of this year. A good, solid bike.

bigjim
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Postby bigjim » Mon Oct 06, 2008 15:16 pm

The gold is original anodised. raleighs colour scheme at the time. I bought it last year. It had never been used. Been stored all it's life. It gets plenty of use now.

Jim

alanmck1971
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Carrera Virtuoso

Postby alanmck1971 » Sat Oct 18, 2008 13:23 pm

I have seen on Halfords website a Carrera Virtuoso costing £250. I am new to the biking world and am looking to try a duathlon next year. Would I be laughed at if I turned up on this bike. If I found that duathlon was not for me I would still use the bike for commuting. I also read that B'TWIN Sport bike from Decathlon is a good entry bike.
Any comments please?

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Mal_A
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Postby Mal_A » Wed Oct 22, 2008 16:03 pm

CarpetFitter wrote:One more question before I make the plunge!

My local store only has a medium Giant SCR 3.0 left. I'm 5'11" and e-mailed them to see if this was ok. They said it was and that it's in line with Giant's size guide (5'4" to 5'11" inches or something like that). Silly question maybe but would it be better to try and fit somewhere that has a large aswell? Although I'm technically the right size for the medium, I don't want to have the wool pulled over my eyes by the shop because they have no large and just want to get rid of it.


I bought a Large SCR 1.5 in August; I'm 5'11" (and a bit - not quite 6ft) and probably average build (I weigh just under 12st).

I tried various sizes by various manufacturers before I bought the one I did. Different bike shops will tell you different things, for instance two different LBS' fitted me to different size Bianchi via Nirone (one said 55" the other 57") and both were absolutely certain they were right... I got fitted for a Trek & a Specialized at different shops and again one was a medium another a large.

At the end of the day unless you're bang in the middle of a size recommendation it's going to be down to personal choice, you'll need to get on the thing & have a spin,it really is the only way to tell. You really should try both sizes though, it's the only way to tell which will be more comfortable.

BTW, I love mine, it took me a little while to get used to because I was used to my MTB but I absolutely love it now, sooo quick.

coxy84
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Postby coxy84 » Wed Nov 05, 2008 14:37 pm

hello im doing lejog summer of 09 was wondering what bikes peolpe think
are good to use, touring road or cross.

im concerned that tourers look a bit bulky and slow but at the same time im
sure a road bike would destroy my rrrrss.

gonna need to take panniers got about 6 to 7 hundred to spend any ideas ?

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giant man
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Postby giant man » Sun Nov 16, 2008 12:36 pm

[quote="bigjim"]Imagehttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3068/2907375767_ab609471bc_b.jpg

Or you could buy one of these for £50 to start you off like I did.

:D


[/quote]

Not much point if it doesn't fit him eh? Fit is EVERYTHING so do yourself a favour, get yourself measured and understand geometries, because every model of frame is different.

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giant man
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Postby giant man » Sun Nov 16, 2008 12:39 pm

RobN20 wrote:Will do. Off to an independant in Sawbridgeworth this morning. About the only local indie I know.

Not much in Sawbridgeworth, which dealer is this? Do you mean Bakers Bikes in Bishops Stortford?

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STEFANOS4784
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Postby STEFANOS4784 » Sat Nov 29, 2008 19:05 pm

bigjim wrote:Imagehttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3068/2907375767_ab609471bc_b.jpg

Or you could buy one of these for £50 to start you off like I did.

:D





I'll give ya 75 quid for it, tidy profit for you :wink:

stabilised
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Postby stabilised » Fri Dec 05, 2008 10:05 am

I had one of those, once (although not in quite such a huge size). I'm struggling to be nostalgic about it though! There have been too many advances in technology for me to really want to go back to riding friction gears, single pivot brakes and suicide extension levers.

Janksy
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Which bike to buy?

Postby Janksy » Wed Dec 17, 2008 15:11 pm

I can either buy a Ribble Ribelle Carbon Road frame at £505 brand new or a Kuota Ksano full carbon race frame for £300 secondhand 4 years old in good nick but with a few chips in the paint that have been touched up. Which is the best buy if they both fiit me nicely? Please either help with your experiences or advice with these frames or put onto a forum on Bike Radar that can help me? Thanks folks. :wink:

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STEFANOS4784
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Re: Which bike to buy?

Postby STEFANOS4784 » Mon Dec 22, 2008 11:17 am

Janksy wrote:I can either buy a Ribble Ribelle Carbon Road frame at £505 brand new or a Kuota Ksano full carbon race frame for £300 secondhand 4 years old in good nick but with a few chips in the paint that have been touched up. Which is the best buy if they both fiit me nicely? Please either help with your experiences or advice with these frames or put onto a forum on Bike Radar that can help me? Thanks folks. :wink:



Get the Kuota, i got one and it's ace :D


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