Are chainrings 9 or 10 speed specific??

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dieselgeezer
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Are chainrings 9 or 10 speed specific??

Postby dieselgeezer » Mon Jun 07, 2010 18:24 pm

I'm using an FSA carbon chainset from an era when 9 speed was the norm. On the 50 big ring the chain is quite noisy. Could it be that the chain ring is designed to run on a 9 speed chain as opposed to the narrower 10 speed? Having said this, the 34 ring is normally quiet. Any thoughts?
Many thanks
-- "I am but a spoke in the wheel of life" -- Ghandi

pete.whelan
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Postby pete.whelan » Mon Jun 07, 2010 18:52 pm

Simple answer is yes/no

Some manufacturers did make 10spd rings slightly narrower.

TA replacement rings are good for 9/10 speed
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John.T
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Postby John.T » Mon Jun 07, 2010 19:52 pm

I have been running a 9sp Dura-ace chainset on 10sp with no problem. It works quietly.

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Wheelspinner
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Postby Wheelspinner » Tue Jun 08, 2010 00:31 am

There is a tiny difference between 9 and 10 speed chainrings, but perhaps not how you might expect. The teeth (generally) are the same profile, as the difference between the two chains is in the thickness of the outer link plates, not the roller width.

The machining of the chain rings is what determines the gap spacing between the two rings, and this is normally where there is a difference between 9 and 10 speed. The only typical problem you can get is with your front derailleur indexing as the spacing for 10 speed is very marginally smaller.

Having said that, like John T, I used 10 speed Dura Ace chain and derailleurs with their 9 speed crankset with no problems whatsoever.

If it's noisy for you, perhaps check the chainring and/or chain for wear.

BliarOut
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Postby BliarOut » Tue Jun 08, 2010 10:52 am

All you ever wanted to know about chainwheel thicknesses but were afraid to ask :)

http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

dieselgeezer
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Postby dieselgeezer » Tue Jun 08, 2010 16:14 pm

The Sheldon Brown link is taking me to cassettes rather than chainrings. A quick look on his site for the latter doesn't seem to give any info on ring thickness.
-- "I am but a spoke in the wheel of life" -- Ghandi

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John.T
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Postby John.T » Tue Jun 08, 2010 16:43 pm

dieselgeezer wrote:The Sheldon Brown link is taking me to cassettes rather than chainrings. A quick look on his site for the latter doesn't seem to give any info on ring thickness.

Cassette sprocket thickness is often more acurate than chainring due to the clearances required for the chain. Wheelspinner highlighted the main difference in chainsets. There is no real problem mixing them. As said check for wear, it may well bed in.


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