Anti-seize vs standard grease.

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alomac
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Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby alomac » Sun Dec 09, 2012 06:08 am

Is there any situation where it would be better to use a specialist anti-seize compound rather than something like marine grease? If so, is there any particular type to go for?

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cooldad
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby cooldad » Mon Dec 10, 2012 11:41 am

When you don't want something to seize - a non moving part, as opposed to lubricating.
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alomac
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby alomac » Mon Dec 10, 2012 12:31 pm

Sorry, I realise that distinction, but it seems that in a lot of those cases (preventing non-moving parts from seizing) people still use normal grease or marine grease rather than anti-seize per se. I'm basically wondering if there's any situations where this isn't a good idea.

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Blue Meanie
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby Blue Meanie » Mon Dec 10, 2012 20:00 pm

If you're going to the bother of using a purposed grease then you're probably going to re-visit/service whatever you're fettling - i which case just use cheap grease (whatever you have).

If you're that keen that you strip your (and friends') bikes often then lots of different compounds for different applications is nice. I laugh when friends are servicing CV joints on cars and ask if I've got any CV grease - "What proportion of chromium to molybdenum are you requiring for your viscous lubricant?" /chortle
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supersonic
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby supersonic » Mon Dec 10, 2012 23:35 pm

Don't use lithium grease on static parts though.

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nicklouse
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby nicklouse » Mon Dec 10, 2012 23:49 pm

alomac wrote:Sorry, I realise that distinction, but it seems that in a lot of those cases (preventing non-moving parts from seizing) people still use normal grease or marine grease rather than anti-seize per se. I'm basically wondering if there's any situations where this isn't a good idea.

many people do. and i have had to fix a lot where people have used the wrong stuff.

even to coppa paste where grease should have been used.

for a short term fit anything is better than nothing on a thread but on a bearing surface....
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Underscore
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby Underscore » Tue Dec 11, 2012 08:29 am

supersonic wrote:Don't use lithium grease on static parts though.

Interesting; why is that?

I bought a tube of white lithium grease after I was able to remove the BB without anything more than a breaker bar from my commuter after many thousand miles and found that the bike shop had used the stuff. I've used it ever since but I'm now concerned that might not have been a good thing...

_

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supersonic
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby supersonic » Tue Dec 11, 2012 18:48 pm

In my experience it dries out and bonds metal parts together, as well as rots seals. Is meant to be used for dynamic applications.

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The Rookie
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby The Rookie » Wed Dec 12, 2012 14:30 pm

Underscore wrote:I bought a tube of white lithium grease after I was able to remove the BB without anything more than a breaker bar from my commuter after many thousand miles and found that the bike shop had used the stuff.
_

It was because they had used the stuff you couldn't get it apart!

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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby Underscore » Thu Dec 13, 2012 08:36 am

The Beginner wrote:
Underscore wrote:I bought a tube of white lithium grease after I was able to remove the BB without anything more than a breaker bar from my commuter after many thousand miles and found that the bike shop had used the stuff.
_

It was because they had used the stuff you couldn't get it apart!

You miss read: I was able to get it apart more easily than I expected...

_

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Big_Paul
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby Big_Paul » Mon Dec 17, 2012 23:21 pm

If it's not meant to move, I use moly grease, if it's meant to move, I use Keenol.
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The Rookie
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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby The Rookie » Tue Dec 18, 2012 09:23 am

Underscore wrote:
The Beginner wrote:
Underscore wrote:I bought a tube of white lithium grease after I was able to remove the BB without anything more than a breaker bar from my commuter after many thousand miles and found that the bike shop had used the stuff.
_

It was because they had used the stuff you couldn't get it apart!

You miss read: I was able to get it apart more easily than I expected...

_

So why were you using a breaker bar? My 1/2" ratchet is normally more than enough for a BB.

Actually for BB's the biggest thing is stopping moisture getting in, do that and the chances of it seizing are small.

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Re: Anti-seize vs standard grease.

Postby Underscore » Tue Dec 18, 2012 13:57 pm

The Beginner wrote:So why were you using a breaker bar? My 1/2" ratchet is normally more than enough for a BB.


Well, it was the first thing I tried as my 1/2" socket set wasn't easily to hand - I only use 1/4" and 3/8" as a matter of course - but the breaker bar was. However, from recollection, I think that the T-bar would still have been a struggle - which, given the torque that you're supposed to tighten them to, is not too surprising given how long (and in what conditions) it had been in there.

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