HR Zones analysis

When drugs don't work: training and health tips!
rich164h
Posts: 421
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 20:10 pm

Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby rich164h » Wed Jan 02, 2013 13:57 pm

maddog 2 wrote:aside from all this wittering, can anyone actually answer the original question?

Or if Connect can't do it, whether another software/method can give you the zone times?

Garmin connect doesn't appear to but I'm pretty sure that the desktop Garmin tool (training centre) does, and also Sporttracks does this as well.

stevez
Posts: 25
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 20:17 pm

Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby stevez » Wed Jan 02, 2013 14:07 pm

maddog 2 wrote:aside from all this wittering, can anyone actually answer the original question?

Or if Connect can't do it, whether another software/method can give you the zone times?


Can't be done using Connect apparently. Can be done using Strava Premium, Training Peaks etc. but you have to pay for them.

mike101
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Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 13:08 pm

Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby mike101 » Wed Jan 02, 2013 14:12 pm

Training Peaks basic is free and gives you HR Zones by time. So does the Garmin Training Centre download.

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bhickey
Posts: 41
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby bhickey » Wed Jan 02, 2013 14:54 pm

stevez wrote:Have decided to use HR Zone as a basis for my training in 2013. Having set up all my zones on my Garmin Edge 500, I now can't find any data in Garmin Connect bar basic HR data. I'm especially interested in seeing how long I spent in each zone.

Anyone know if this can be done on Garmin Connect?


Yes. If you select the ride you want to view the detailed data for, a screen will be displayed with all the various data fields (elevation, timing etc). If you look at the HR feld you will see three sub-fields to the right - bpm, % of max and zones. If you select 'zones' the graph showing HR on the right of the screen will be re-formatted (bpm is the default) to display your HR data in zones. It assumes you have your zones properly set up on the Edge 500 and that the data has been captured properly (ie you have been wearing the HRM during the ride).

If this description doesnt help you I will try to post a screen grab.

Cheers.

stevez
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby stevez » Wed Jan 02, 2013 15:17 pm

It displays the data in Zones which is in itself interesting, but I was more interested in time spent in each zone which I don't think it can display?

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bhickey
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby bhickey » Wed Jan 02, 2013 15:44 pm

stevez wrote:It displays the data in Zones which is in itself interesting, but I was more interested in time spent in each zone which I don't think it can display?


I cant see a way of doing that unless you manually estimate it by selecting time for the x axis and then use the cursor to select start/stop times - messy, time consuming and inaccurate so not a good solution. I use a Polar HRM for non bike activity and their Pro Trainer displays the data in the way you would like so I know what you are after. I'll defer to some of the other posters who have suggested upload to other analytical tools - unless Garmin support can offer some additional thoughts...?

Tom_UK
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Tom_UK » Wed Jan 02, 2013 15:46 pm

You will need to use the Garmin Training Center software to view that data without using a paid for solution I believe.

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Alex_Simmons/RST
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Alex_Simmons/RST » Wed Jan 02, 2013 21:39 pm

Trev The Rev wrote:
Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
Trev The Rev wrote:
stevez wrote:Have decided to use HR Zone as a basis for my training in 2013. Having set up all my zones on my Garmin Edge 500, I now can't find any data in Garmin Connect bar basic HR data. I'm especially interested in seeing how long I spent in each zone.

Anyone know if this can be done on Garmin Connect?


You don't have problems like this if you train with feel.

Newer riders often need help to learn to know the sensations of riding at appropriate intensities, and using guides such as HR or power can be very helpful to help them calibrate that.

You have had the benefit of using such tools for a long time and probably have well tuned your calibration of PE.


I see your point, however unless you did no sport as a child, most people should be able to judge effort well,


That is not the case in my (considerable) experience - pacing on a bike is quite tricky for newer riders to get right, and many other sports that people may have come from either have the more consistent resistance feel of running or swimming (which you don't have on a bike), or are more sprint/ballistic in nature (e.g. football, netball) where pacing isn't as important.

And when I check the pacing of those who race time trials, guess what the #1 mistake made is?

How many times have you let riders go ahead at the start of a hillclimb, only to overhaul them halfway and leave them in your wake?

Pacing is a learned skill in cycling. And one needs to learn that the sensations one feels actually change, even though actual effort (power) doesn't.

Trev The Rev
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Trev The Rev » Thu Jan 03, 2013 09:04 am

Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
That is not the case in my (considerable) experience - pacing on a bike is quite tricky for newer riders to get right, and many other sports that people may have come from either have the more consistent resistance feel of running or swimming (which you don't have on a bike), or are more sprint/ballistic in nature (e.g. football, netball) where pacing isn't as important.

And when I check the pacing of those who race time trials, guess what the #1 mistake made is?

How many times have you let riders go ahead at the start of a hillclimb, only to overhaul them halfway and leave them in your wake?

Pacing is a learned skill in cycling. And one needs to learn that the sensations one feels actually change, even though actual effort (power) doesn't.


Pacing is a learned skill and if you learn it by numbers you will become reliant on numbers. Many riders can pace very well indeed without a power meter, even time triallists and they have done so for decades. A power meter is a great tool in the right hands, there is no need to brainwash people into believing you need one to train & race or need one to pace correctly.

Pacing is a skill, it is sad to see that skill being lost. You do not need a power meter to pace properly but you do need a brain, preferably a brain that can understand what the body is telling it rather than one that can only look at numbers and follow orders.

Power meters should be banned in races anyway.

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Alex_Simmons/RST
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Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Alex_Simmons/RST » Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:58 am

Trev The Rev wrote:
Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
That is not the case in my (considerable) experience - pacing on a bike is quite tricky for newer riders to get right, and many other sports that people may have come from either have the more consistent resistance feel of running or swimming (which you don't have on a bike), or are more sprint/ballistic in nature (e.g. football, netball) where pacing isn't as important.

And when I check the pacing of those who race time trials, guess what the #1 mistake made is?

How many times have you let riders go ahead at the start of a hillclimb, only to overhaul them halfway and leave them in your wake?

Pacing is a learned skill in cycling. And one needs to learn that the sensations one feels actually change, even though actual effort (power) doesn't.


Pacing is a learned skill and if you learn it by numbers you will become reliant on numbers. Many riders can pace very well indeed without a power meter, even time triallists and they have done so for decades. A power meter is a great tool in the right hands, there is no need to brainwash people into believing you need one to train & race or need one to pace correctly.

Pacing is a skill, it is sad to see that skill being lost. You do not need a power meter to pace properly but you do need a brain, preferably a brain that can understand what the body is telling it rather than one that can only look at numbers and follow orders.

Power meters should be banned in races anyway.

I have not:
1. sought to brainwash anyone
2. said pacing is not a learned skill, nor suggested it's something good time triallists don't already do well*
3. suggest one can't learn to pace without a power meter or "numbers"

so don't put words in my mouth.

Computers of all types are banned in all track races (well having a visible display is banned - you can still record the data).


* indeed I demonstrated this very fact in my discussion paper on time trial pacing optimisation where I quantitatively analysed the pacing of riders from pro tour to club amateur level - the most successful TT riders pace very well (as one would expect)

Trev The Rev
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Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 09:10 am

Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Trev The Rev » Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:18 am

Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
Trev The Rev wrote:
Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
That is not the case in my (considerable) experience - pacing on a bike is quite tricky for newer riders to get right, and many other sports that people may have come from either have the more consistent resistance feel of running or swimming (which you don't have on a bike), or are more sprint/ballistic in nature (e.g. football, netball) where pacing isn't as important.

And when I check the pacing of those who race time trials, guess what the #1 mistake made is?

How many times have you let riders go ahead at the start of a hillclimb, only to overhaul them halfway and leave them in your wake?

Pacing is a learned skill in cycling. And one needs to learn that the sensations one feels actually change, even though actual effort (power) doesn't.


Pacing is a learned skill and if you learn it by numbers you will become reliant on numbers. Many riders can pace very well indeed without a power meter, even time triallists and they have done so for decades. A power meter is a great tool in the right hands, there is no need to brainwash people into believing you need one to train & race or need one to pace correctly.

Pacing is a skill, it is sad to see that skill being lost. You do not need a power meter to pace properly but you do need a brain, preferably a brain that can understand what the body is telling it rather than one that can only look at numbers and follow orders.

Power meters should be banned in races anyway.

I have not:
1. sought to brainwash anyone
2. said pacing is not a learned skill, nor suggested it's something good time triallists don't already do well*
3. suggest one can't learn to pace without a power meter or "numbers"

so don't put words in my mouth.

Computers of all types are banned in all track races (well having a visible display is banned - you can still record the data).


* indeed I demonstrated this very fact in my discussion paper on time trial pacing optimisation where I quantitatively analysed the pacing of riders from pro tour to club amateur level - the most successful TT riders pace very well (as one would expect)


Sorry Alex. Points taken.

Siim_S
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 13:34 pm

Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Siim_S » Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:38 am

I've found the easiest way to see the distribution between zones is to use Sportlyzer (.com). Their system can automatically sync the data from garmin connect and then provide you with nice data about the percentage/time spent in each zone.

Trev The Rev
Posts: 1005
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 09:10 am

Re: HR Zones analysis

Postby Trev The Rev » Fri Jan 04, 2013 09:12 am

Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
Trev The Rev wrote:
Alex_Simmons/RST wrote:
That is not the case in my (considerable) experience - pacing on a bike is quite tricky for newer riders to get right, and many other sports that people may have come from either have the more consistent resistance feel of running or swimming (which you don't have on a bike), or are more sprint/ballistic in nature (e.g. football, netball) where pacing isn't as important.

And when I check the pacing of those who race time trials, guess what the #1 mistake made is?

How many times have you let riders go ahead at the start of a hillclimb, only to overhaul them halfway and leave them in your wake?

Pacing is a learned skill in cycling. And one needs to learn that the sensations one feels actually change, even though actual effort (power) doesn't.


Pacing is a learned skill and if you learn it by numbers you will become reliant on numbers. Many riders can pace very well indeed without a power meter, even time triallists and they have done so for decades. A power meter is a great tool in the right hands, there is no need to brainwash people into believing you need one to train & race or need one to pace correctly.

Pacing is a skill, it is sad to see that skill being lost. You do not need a power meter to pace properly but you do need a brain, preferably a brain that can understand what the body is telling it rather than one that can only look at numbers and follow orders.

Power meters should be banned in races anyway.

I have not:
1. sought to brainwash anyone
2. said pacing is not a learned skill, nor suggested it's something good time triallists don't already do well*
3. suggest one can't learn to pace without a power meter or "numbers"

so don't put words in my mouth.

Computers of all types are banned in all track races (well having a visible display is banned - you can still record the data).


* indeed I demonstrated this very fact in my discussion paper on time trial pacing optimisation where I quantitatively analysed the pacing of riders from pro tour to club amateur level - the most successful TT riders pace very well (as one would expect)


Alex, can you post a link or email it to me at trevtherev@ymail.com?


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