Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

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schemieradge
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Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby schemieradge » Mon Oct 15, 2012 19:39 pm

This is my first winter cycle commuting...

I had planned on getting Marathon Winters for the really cold weather... but surprised how much ice there is around in the mornings just now.

Do you think there is any value in putting on my super nobbly Schwalbe Mountaineer II's over my slickish Continental Travel Contacts at the moment?
I have a question mark over whether nobblys would actually provide any more grip in icy conditions? Mud yes, but ice?

My commute is country road, trail, and a bit of town.

Also when how cold do people generally let it get before switching to studs?

Cheers for any advice!

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Initialised
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby Initialised » Mon Oct 15, 2012 21:26 pm

Go for studs it there is likely to be any ice anywhere on your route.

In fresh snow big fat knobblies like 3"+ would be better but that's specialist fat bike territory.

Only studs will get traction on ice.
I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.

Bordersroadie
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby Bordersroadie » Tue Oct 16, 2012 08:22 am

Agree with all of that.

The slightly irritating thing is that the commute to work is often icy and the commute back often isn't, on the same day, so I'm in the dilemma of maybe risking the normal road bike on frosty morings to avoid the pain of riding on dry, frost-free roads on the way home, with the heavy ice bike.

However, I usually don't regret taking the studded tyres out. It takes only one icy corner and I know it's been worth it.

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nicklouse
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby nicklouse » Tue Oct 16, 2012 08:32 am

Bordersroadie wrote:Agree with all of that.

The slightly irritating thing is that the commute to work is often icy and the commute back often isn't, on the same day, so I'm in the dilemma of maybe risking the normal road bike on frosty morings to avoid the pain of riding on dry, frost-free roads on the way home, with the heavy ice bike.

However, I usually don't regret taking the studded tyres out. It takes only one icy corner and I know it's been worth it.

add air for the return trip. will keep the studs clear of the road.
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jejv
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby jejv » Tue Oct 16, 2012 09:03 am

schemieradge wrote:Do you think there is any value in putting on my super nobbly Schwalbe Mountaineer II's over my slickish Continental Travel Contacts at the moment?
I have a question mark over whether nobblys would actually provide any more grip in icy conditions? Mud yes, but ice?

No.

Knobblies will only work better if they can dig in to, or catch on, the surface. So on a hard surface, even off-road, slicks will likely grip better, and at the limit, will start sliding more gradually - in a more controllable way.

Then on ice, "more gradually" could still be too quick.

Travel Contacts are knobbley at the sides and nearly slick in the middle. If you want the knobbles to do much on soft surfaces, probably need to run very low pressures - like 30psi. Otherwise they're only going to help in deepish mud - at which point proper mud tyres would be better. Lower pressures will generally help grip.

schemieradge wrote:My commute is country road, trail, and a bit of town.

Also when how cold do people generally let it get before switching to studs?

When frost is forecast in the next few days.

Helps to have spare wheels.

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The Rookie
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby The Rookie » Tue Oct 16, 2012 13:48 pm

MTFU and carry on without studs.....to be fair my route stays ice free even on very cold mornings as it's all gritted once I get beyond the end of my road and as I'm on 1.5" MTB tyres the compounds a bit softer than a thin tread tyre.

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fossyant
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby fossyant » Tue Oct 16, 2012 14:12 pm

Knobblies are no good on ice. Proved it myself many years bike. You need studded tyres.

schemieradge
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby schemieradge » Tue Oct 16, 2012 21:48 pm

Cheers for all the help... looks like I need to get shopping.
How much would you say studded tyres slow you down?

I've got a 35min commute generally.. with studs what do you reckon, 40-45?

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fossyant
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby fossyant » Wed Oct 17, 2012 02:34 am

Depends upon the tyre. I switch from 23mm road bike to 26 inch MTB, so it seeks like the time has doubled. Extra 5 mins maximum.

Ideally they would be on spare wheels or a bike, but if you run them hard when no ice, then drop the pressure when icy, this is a good compromise

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DrLex
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Re: Another tyre Q: nobblys before studs?

Postby DrLex » Wed Oct 17, 2012 07:27 am

fossyant wrote:Depends upon the tyre. I switch from 23mm road bike to 26 inch MTB, so it seeks like the time has doubled. Extra 5 mins maximum.

Ideally they would be on spare wheels or a bike, but if you run them hard when no ice, then drop the pressure when icy, this is a good compromise


And how flat your commute is - those studded tyres are heavy - Winters are almost 1kg each!


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