Change in position

General bike chat that does not fit elsewhere
bluedog99
Posts: 168
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:49 pm

Change in position

Postby bluedog99 » Tue Nov 20, 2012 13:24 pm

I have recently been for a bike fitting and ordered a new bike. They have also set my existing bike up to match the new one when it is ready. This has meant the saddle has gone up by about an inch and back about 3/4 inch. Mt question is; how much would you reduce your workload on the bike by, if at all? Would you avoid hills? and just ride an easy pace to get used to the new position? Thanks for any imput, cheers.
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TheFD
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Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2011 15:08 pm

Re: Change in position

Postby TheFD » Tue Nov 20, 2012 13:46 pm

bluedog99 wrote:I have recently been for a bike fitting and ordered a new bike. They have also set my existing bike up to match the new one when it is ready. This has meant the saddle has gone up by about an inch and back about 3/4 inch. Mt question is; how much would you reduce your workload on the bike by, if at all? Would you avoid hills? and just ride an easy pace to get used to the new position? Thanks for any imput, cheers.

No - just ride it how you would normally. When you get your new bike are you going to avoid hills etc?
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bluedog99
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Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:49 pm

Re: Change in position

Postby bluedog99 » Tue Nov 20, 2012 14:41 pm

Hopefully i won`t avoid the hills, just thought new cycling action may need to be a gradual process. Thanks for the reply.
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schleckster
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Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2012 00:23 am

Re: Change in position

Postby schleckster » Tue Nov 20, 2012 15:15 pm

I would say just go out and ride it as per in the new position, if you get back and you're feeling a sore spot anywhere, something still needs adjusting, handlebar angle, seat height up or down, seat position forward or back; riding at lesser intensity or on an easier route isn't going to show something like that up.

For example, I have been playing around with saddle height recently. I used exactly the same route twice so I had some kind of standardisation.

One ride was in a position where I thought I was too high and slightly over extending on the down stroke.

For the other I moved the saddle down by one inch, felt I had slightly better power transfer but ended up with a pain in my shoulder from the new position.

I put it back, raised the angle of the hoods/bar slightly, and the soreness went away. It's a new bike so I will get a proper fitting eventually, probably after six months when I get it serviced.

FlacVest
Posts: 99
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 20:05 pm

Re: Change in position

Postby FlacVest » Tue Nov 20, 2012 21:52 pm

You have to ride hard, and for a long time, in order to push your body to find out what actually doesn't work; I learned this when first getting clipless pedals/shoes and throwing aero bars on my bike.

Each new addition required an hour in the saddle before I felt uncomfortable; moving of the cleats, raising the saddle, and moving of the bars all had to be done separately until I found the combo that fit.

Luckily it only took 4 or so rides :)

lef
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Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 12:31 pm

Re: Change in position

Postby lef » Tue Nov 20, 2012 22:03 pm

FlacVest wrote:You have to ride hard, and for a long time, in order to push your body to find out what actually doesn't work; I learned this when first getting clipless pedals/shoes and throwing aero bars on my bike.

Each new addition required an hour in the saddle before I felt uncomfortable; moving of the cleats, raising the saddle, and moving of the bars all had to be done separately until I found the combo that fit.

Luckily it only took 4 or so rides :)


I take it you are being sarcastic, if not this has got to be the worst advice I have come across on here for some time.

Dont go for a two hour ride and find out half way through your knees are screaming. Likewise dont go for a high intensity ride thinking all is okay then the next day if feels like someone has sledge hammered your knees. Just be sensible. A couple of endurance pace rides at a sensible distance should highlight any major issues.

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ALIHISGREAT
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Re: Change in position

Postby ALIHISGREAT » Tue Nov 20, 2012 22:13 pm

TheFD wrote:
bluedog99 wrote:I have recently been for a bike fitting and ordered a new bike. They have also set my existing bike up to match the new one when it is ready. This has meant the saddle has gone up by about an inch and back about 3/4 inch. Mt question is; how much would you reduce your workload on the bike by, if at all? Would you avoid hills? and just ride an easy pace to get used to the new position? Thanks for any imput, cheers.

No - just ride it how you would normally. When you get your new bike are you going to avoid hills etc?


Terrible advice.


Take it easy for a week and let your muscles adjust and get used to the new position.. it also means you can nip any problems in the bud instead of cracking on with a hilly 100 miler and coming back with no knees.

lef
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Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 12:31 pm

Re: Change in position

Postby lef » Tue Nov 20, 2012 22:17 pm

...plus not taking it easy can set off all kinds of ongoing issues such as ITB which you could end up dealing with for weeks or months to come.

bluedog99
Posts: 168
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:49 pm

Re: Change in position

Postby bluedog99 » Tue Nov 20, 2012 23:59 pm

Thanks to you all for the replies, I will take it easy for a few rides and see if I have any problems. Then gradually in crease intensity and distance. Hopefully there'd will not be to many issues, if any at all. Thanks once again.
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