Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

New to Cycling? Want some advice? Start here...
User avatar
fishyweb
Posts: 174
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 07:18 am
Contact:

Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby fishyweb » Wed Apr 03, 2013 08:05 am

My 4.5 year old Giant SCR2 has just over 5000 mile son the clock (I don't get out much!), and is still fitted with all the original components apart from stem, saddle and tyres. It has been a good, reliable bike, but I'm now training for my first 100 mile sportive and don't want any sudden breakdowns...

On average, how long (or far) should I expect a chain to last? I'm not a big, strong rider, so I guess I don't put it under as much strain as the pros amongst you. :)

Also, my Vittoria Rubino Pro tyres have about 4500 miles. I can't see too much in the way of wear, and a few small nicks. How long ought these tyres last, and what tell tale signs should I look for to indicate that they are ready for replacement?

Are there any other components that I should be weary of at this age and mileage?
http://app.strava.com/athletes/287459
Member of http://www.UKnetrunner.co.UK - the greatest online affiliated running club

User avatar
shadow4532
Posts: 133
Joined: Tue Mar 26, 2013 15:00 pm

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby shadow4532 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 08:41 am

not sure about everyone else but i tend to replace my chain once a year and tyres when the cuts get too deep and i can see canvas. also when you replace the chain it may be worth changing the cassette at the same time.

djm501
Posts: 373
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:57 pm

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby djm501 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 09:51 am

For the chain you should get a chain wear gauge (e.g. http://www.parktool.com/product/chain-w ... tor-CC-3-2 - other products are available)

It sounds to me rather like it will be well worn by now - too worn in fact.

I did this at first with fewer miles than you on both my bikes and the chains were worn so badly I needed to replace the cassette on one of them.
A badly worn chain will cause accelerated wear to the cassette and eventually the (much more expensive to replace) chain rings. Replacing the chain is much cheaper than replacing the sprockets.

I would definitely get a gauge and if you get skipping on replacing the chain I would replace the cassette. You are probably OK with the chainrings at this mileage but don't push it.

Danlikesbikes
Posts: 3871
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 22:10 pm

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby Danlikesbikes » Wed Apr 03, 2013 10:06 am

No set rule & also depends on how you treat your bike. Sounds like you are pretty good to your bike in terms of changing if your not a hard rider & if you clean/lube your bike regularly you can really extend the life of your chain and cassette.

As others have said you can alway buy a cheap chain wear gauge or let your local bike shop do this for you. Though it is very easy to do yourself & only takes about 60 seconds.

Tyres does differ on the conditions of your local roads, how heavy you & the bike are, to some extend the speed you do (of your flying round corners etc) if you look after them clean out any small stones. They are a high milage tyre though so you should be OK with them, just do a visual inspection & look for any deep cuts into the core or any signs of the outer being worn through.
Pain hurts much less if its topped off with beating your mates to top of a climb.

Simon E
Posts: 1553
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2006 20:24 pm

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby Simon E » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:25 am

To check chain wear either buy a Park CC-3 or use a ruler. Put the chain under tension (a screwdriver through the spokes and put weight on the pedal). 10 links c-to-c are 25.4 cm when new. Up to 25.5 cm is OK. A bit past 25.5 cm you should replace the chain, but the cassette should be fine. If it is near 25.7 cm you have left it too long, and the most used sprockets will be too badly worn and chain will skip/shift poorly.

New chain: KMC X9-93 or Sram PC951 would be ideal. Shimano HG50 9 speed 12-25 cassette is probaby what you have fitted, really cheap at wiggle just now.

Check your brake pads for wear. The SCR's original pads aren't the best.

I'd be inclined to replace the tyres after 4500 miles, or at least the rear. Rubino Pro is a good all-rounder. If your tyres are still good and the rear profile hasn't flattened off then just make sure you have spare tubes, levers, pump etc.

If rear shifting is sluggish (muck in the cable housing) then it might be worth fitting a new cable and outer for the rear derailleur. If you know a reliable, trustworthy dealer or bike mechanic then drop it in for a once-over or service.
Aspire not to have more, but to be more.

keef66
Posts: 8712
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 09:46 am

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby keef66 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:40 am

I just replace things when they break or wear out. My bike's a similar age / mileage to yours. So far it's had 3 chains, one gear cable and a rear tyre.

Unless you've been fanatical about cleaning and lubrication, I suspect if you haven't changed the chain in 5000 miles then a new one is going to skip on the cassette which will have started to wear. Try replacing just the chain though; you might get away with it.

Tyres I usually run them till the carcass starts to show through the tread or they start getting frequent punctures.

User avatar
fishyweb
Posts: 174
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 07:18 am
Contact:

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby fishyweb » Sat Apr 06, 2013 08:50 am

Thanks guys. Got a chain wear gauge, and found the chain is well worn (1+mm)! Just ordering replacement + cassette. Tyres seem OK at the moment.
http://app.strava.com/athletes/287459
Member of http://www.UKnetrunner.co.UK - the greatest online affiliated running club

djm501
Posts: 373
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:57 pm

Re: Longevity of tyres, chain, etc

Postby djm501 » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:06 pm

Nice one - to be fair, 4.5 years on one cassette and chain is a pretty decent effort.


Return to “Road Beginners”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests