Scott Addict R4 review£1,999.00

Entry-level Addict

BikeRadar score4.5/5Find prices on Bicycle Blue Book

The R4 is the entry-level model of Scott’s Addict road racing range, and its nimble and graceful riding character could easily get you hooked. With an overall weight of 7.78kg (17.1lb) for this 56cm test rig, it has the high build quality and sprinkling of unique features expected from a big player at the top of its game.

Ride & handling: light and nimble

If bikes were dance partners, the Scott would be Fred Astaire - light and nimble thanks to innate natural strength and co-ordination. The French expression ‘en danseuse’ is particularly apt when describing what it’s like to stand on the pedals of this most accomplished of bicycles. 

Line corrections on decreasing radius turns were possible thanks to its deft touch and sure-footedness. Both nimble and compliant, it will happily swap either leading or following roles. 

On a transition from smooth tarmac into a slamming set of pavés you can let it take over and find its way. Or grab a firm hold of the perfectly shaped Scott Road bars and launch a lung-busting attack up a local climb, while trying to latch onto the back of a lumbering gravel lorry in the big ring. 

If the extreme muscular effort doesn’t send you into oxygen debt, the ensuing asthma attack most definitely will.

An accomplished all-rounder without a doubt.

Scott addict r4: scott addict r4
Scott addict r4: scott addict r4

Frame: a carbon stunner

The Addict R4 is a real stunner based around a 1kg frame – about 100g lighter than its predecessor the CR1 at 1010g, the weight savings have been helped by the use of carbon dropouts. 

It has autopilot when required with a 100cm wheelbase and nearly parallel 73-degree head and seat angles. Scott has opted to stick with a standard threaded bottom bracket while still managing to create a firm pedalling platform. 

The R4, retailing at £1999, is the entry-level model of a five-bike posse led by the Addict Ltd, which features the best componentry arsenal money can buy. The R1, R2 and Ltd share the same geometry as the R4 and R3 but use lighter carbon.

Equipment: quirky gearing and powerful braking

Q-factor – the distance between the pedals – is low on the R4 with a nicely rigid Rival crank of straightforward design. But the SRAM shifting is a little quirky and involves some retraining. The fact that you have to push through the release click to grab a lower gear at the back eventually becomes second nature, although when trying to trim outwardly for chain rub in the big ring/small cog, the same mechanical response on the left results in an unwanted shift into the little ring. Make sure you achieve the maximum stroke onto the big ring on your first try.  

The Rival brakes are powerful and give all the other contenders a serious run for their money. The rear brake requires a bit more attention to modulation if you’re used to Campagnolo’s reduced power rear differential brake calliper. It's not for the careless or ham-fisted.

Gear ratios seemed to offer all or nothing. The 11-28 cassette created more awkward gaps than some of our testers could tolerate, so with a 34/50 combo we’d suggest a closer spaced 12-23 for those with a bit of fitness.

Benchmark Mavic Ksyrium Equipes are a good match for the frame and prove that steel spokes still have their place in wheel building. Their increased elasticity was effective in blunting the sharp spikes experienced in sudden road shocks, with the help of comfortable Hutchinson Fusions in 23c size, despite being inflated to 110 psi.

The spec is completed by great Scott Road bars and a well padded Scott saddle.

Related Articles

Back to top