Static Evil Twin £200

Bargain dirt jumper that happens to be rather good

BikeRadar score 4/5

The Static Bikes Evil Twin is well-constructed dirt-jump frame at a bargain price. Its long top tube makes it especially suited to taller riders and its low-slung shape keeps it out of the way for tricks and stunts.

Fronted by Alex Morris, Static Bikes is a small UK company that manufactures a small range of accessories to go with its neat dirt jumping and street-themed frames.

The Plan B is their 24in specific model and it stays true to the street craze of internal headsets, Spanish bottom brackets and modern geometry.  The Evil Twin is the bigger brother and uses 26in wheels and is more capable of taking an off-road thrashing.

Ride: nimbly new skool

For a jump bike, the Evil Twin is long – definitely a good thing as there aren’t enough long bikes out there.The top tube is nice and low – making tricks easy and keeping the frame safely out of harm’s way.

When setting it up, we found we couldn’t slam the back end right in on the chainstays because the tyre we were using was a little fat and rubbed on the chainstay yoke, so our inclusion of a half-link chain was now defunct.

But with a very short rear end anyway, the front end picks up really nicely, and combined with the low stack height of the headset, made for quick handling and a 'new skool' feel. The quality chromoly, despite being heavy duty, kept a nimble feel.

On our sample, some paint remained near the bearing surfaces on the headset so we had to take care in fitting to ensure bearing longevity.

We also had problems with the bottom bracket bearings disintegrating – we went through two sets in a couple of months. The best option would be to get some marine grade bearings to fit instead of the standard units.

Quality of the actual frame was the thing that instantly impressed us – the welding is great – but probably the best thing about Static’s Evil Twin frame is the amazing pricing, it’s only £200.

Frame: neat Taiwanese execution

Made from Japanese Sanko chromoly tubing, the Taiwanese construction is very neat and resembles some top flight BMX frames.

Out back is a standard 135mm spaced rear end, with 14mm dropouts and a 15.6in chainstay. Either adaptors or a specific 14mm cassette hub have to be used.

The bottom bracket is of the Spanish variety – meaning it takes either a 19 or 22mm axle via the supplied bearings, which push in. This system is great for street and park mashers, but the bearings won’t like British conditions.

The roomy 22.75in top tube uses a simple gusset between the top and down tubes, and holds a 1 1/8th head tube that houses a supplied internal headset.

Equipment: keep it simple

We kept our bike looking neat and simple to complement the frame – Marzocchi 4X forks with Deity bars and stem up front mated with 24 Seven SL cranks and Shimano DX pedals.

Wheels were DMR, and we also used DMR’s Transition tyres.

Stopping the Evil Twin was a particularly good Tektro brake, and finishing it off were Gusset post and collar, Fi’zi:k seat and DMR grips.

Comments

Back to top