Scott Wit helmet review

Mid-range lid with road and mountain options

BikeRadar score3.5/5

Sitting just below the flagship Vanish Evo, the Scott Wit is a mid-range helmet with an impressive list of features that is available in either mountain (Wit) or road (Wit-R) variants. Although the presence of visor is the only difference, we tested both variants – each of which is available in four different shades.

Like many others, the Scott uses in-mould technology to bond the shell to helmets' EPS liner, allowing for improved impact resistance and a lighter and more ventilated helmet.

Sporting 25 rather large vents, the Wit performed well at slower off-road speeds, but surprised us on the road by delivering less ventilation than we’d expected. Sizable forward facing vents bring plenty of air into the helmet, but shallower internal channels govern the airflow through it.

At speed, we found the internal channeling not to be as effective at wicking sweat as expected  :
At speed, we found the internal channeling not to be as effective at wicking sweat as expected :

We found sweat pooled just above the brow on hot days

The padding at the front also seems to fill the shallow channels under the brim, limiting the amount of air coming under the front of the helmet and resulting in sweat pooling on hotter days.

Lightweight straps add to the Wit’s feathery nature, but they do create some wind noise on the road.

We found the retention system comfortable, but wished for more vertical adjustment: we found the retention system comfortable, but wished for more vertical adjustment
We found the retention system comfortable, but wished for more vertical adjustment: we found the retention system comfortable, but wished for more vertical adjustment

The retention system is effective, yet we wished for greater vertical adjustment range

Scott’s Micro Rotary Adjustment System (MRAS) features, providing an ergonomic dial for one handed fit adjustment. The whole system is made from flexible nylon which conforms nicely around the wearer's head.

Each of our testers noted that the Scott felt as though it was perched on top of their heads rather than planted around it. At fault for this is the shallow helmet shell, and the short reach of the retention system. Even at the lowest possible height adjustment, the retention system sits rather high on the occipital bone.

This same shallow shell is also worth keeping in mind if you're looking to use the Wit for technical off-road riding. While the helmet is perfectly suited to cross country and trail riding, those seeking further rear head coverage will be better served with an all-mountain type helmet (Scott offers its Stego and Mythic models for this).

The wit's non-adjustable, but removable visor is simple yet effective : the wit's non-adjustable, but removable visor is simple yet effective
The wit's non-adjustable, but removable visor is simple yet effective : the wit's non-adjustable, but removable visor is simple yet effective

The removable visor on the Wit does not offer angle adjustment

The Wit’s visor snaps firmly in place and the fixed angle is sensible without impeding vision unless riding in an ultra-aggressive position.

The Wit-R weighs a claimed 240g in a size medium (Australian standard), though our medium sample came in at 249g – the same as a previously tested Vanish. The addition of a visor gave the helmet a weight of 267g.

Both the Wit and Wit-R are light on the head, then, and on the wallet – but ventilation issues mean this is a design best suited to cooler temperatures, and to mountain biking at slower speeds.

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