New Ibis Mojo HD3 enduro bike officially launched

Reincarnated with 150mm of travel, 27.5in wheels, and modern geometry

Ibis has resurrected the Mojo HD moniker for an all-new carbon enduro machine. Unlike the stopgap Mojo HDR 650b it replaces – which was essentially an older model adapted to fit mid-sized wheels – the new Mojo HD3 is a ground-up 27.5in design with a more capable 150mm of rear wheel travel, a fresh dw-link suspension layout, and thoroughly modern geometry that promises to be just as capable going up as it is entertaining going down. 

Ibis builds the Mojo HD3 around the fifth generation of Dave Weagle's highly successful dw-link suspension design. The short upper and lower links carry over as usual, but Ibis says the updated geometry is optimised for the smaller chainrings now more commonly used with 1x drivetrains, and there's more midstroke support for a firmer pedalling platform throughout the travel range.

The new ibis mojo hd uses a fifth-generation dw-link suspension design with more mid-stroke support for even more efficient pedaling. the one-piece rear triangle and short, stout suspension links yield a noticeably stiff rear end, too: the new ibis mojo hd uses a fifth-generation dw-link suspension design with more mid-stroke support for even more efficient pedaling. the one-piece rear triangle and short, stout suspension links yield a noticeably stiff rear end, too
The new ibis mojo hd uses a fifth-generation dw-link suspension design with more mid-stroke support for even more efficient pedaling. the one-piece rear triangle and short, stout suspension links yield a noticeably stiff rear end, too: the new ibis mojo hd uses a fifth-generation dw-link suspension design with more mid-stroke support for even more efficient pedaling. the one-piece rear triangle and short, stout suspension links yield a noticeably stiff rear end, too

The fifth-generation dw-link rear end pedals better than ever and is designed with 1x drivetrains in mind

The HDR's rear triangle directly drove the rear shock, but the new HD3 borrows a page from the Ripley playbook with a carbon clevis link joining the two bits together. This makes for a stiffer and more compact rear end, plus it raises the shock enough that there's now enough room in combination with the curved down tube to fit a large water bottle inside the main triangle – even on medium-sized frames.

The new frame geometry follows current trends with a longer, lower, and slacker layout that further enhances the HD3's downhill capabilities. Stack increases slightly compared with the HDR – as expected given the extra travel – but reach grows by up to 44mm depending on size for a much roomier cockpit that's more compatible with short stems. Meanwhile, the head tube angle slackens slightly to 67 degrees with a 150mm-travel fork (or 66.6 degrees with a 160mm one), the bottom bracket is relatively low at 340mm (13.4in), and the chainstays are just 430mm long.

The internal cable routing setup is impressively versatile, accommodating a wide number of lines and even allowing for split or continuous derailleur cable setups: the internal cable routing setup is impressively versatile, accommodating a wide number of lines and even allowing for split or continuous derailleur cable setups
The internal cable routing setup is impressively versatile, accommodating a wide number of lines and even allowing for split or continuous derailleur cable setups: the internal cable routing setup is impressively versatile, accommodating a wide number of lines and even allowing for split or continuous derailleur cable setups

The head tube features newly internal cups both top and bottom, plus customisable internal cable routing ports located just behind

The seat tube is also shorter and there's more standover clearance across the board, which should make for more accommodating fits and creates room for 150mm-travel dropper posts.

If all of this sounds like a fully checked-off wish list for a pro-level enduro machine, at least some of the credit has to go to Ibis-sponsored racer – and 19-time mountain bike world champion – Anne-Caroline Chausson, who raced an unlabelled prototype Mojo HD for much of this past Enduro World Series season. Ibis engineer Colin Hughes told BikeRadar that among some of her requests was clearance for 2.4in-wide tyres.

Ibis says there's sufficient clearance for a 2.4in-wide tire mounted on a wide-profile rim. based on how this 2.3in-wide maxxis tire looks on a 35mm-wide (internal width) ibis 741 rim, we're inclined to agree: ibis says there's sufficient clearance for a 2.4in-wide tire mounted on a wide-profile rim. based on how this 2.3in-wide maxxis tire looks on a 35mm-wide (internal width) ibis 741 rim, we're inclined to agree
Ibis says there's sufficient clearance for a 2.4in-wide tire mounted on a wide-profile rim. based on how this 2.3in-wide maxxis tire looks on a 35mm-wide (internal width) ibis 741 rim, we're inclined to agree: ibis says there's sufficient clearance for a 2.4in-wide tire mounted on a wide-profile rim. based on how this 2.3in-wide maxxis tire looks on a 35mm-wide (internal width) ibis 741 rim, we're inclined to agree

There's more space around this 2.3in-wide Maxxis Minion tyre than it appears, plus this one is mounted to Ibis's own ultra-wide 741 carbon rims

Other new features include versatile internal cable routing that's customisable for paths and number of lines, a zero-stack lower headset, new oversized pivots with a greater allotment of angular contact bearing cartridges, a removable front derailleur mount, and moulded guards on the chainstay, seatstay, and down tube. Despite insistence that its frames were largely creak-free, Ibis has nonetheless reverted back to a threaded bottom bracket shell in response to market pressure, complete with cleverly removable ISCG tabs that sandwich in between the driveside cup and frame.

Even better, claimed frame weight is under 2.7kg (5.9lb) including the standard Fox Float rear shock; plus Ibis has managed to maintain the company's longstanding design language while presenting a fresh visual package that we think looks fantastic, especially in some of the 'Werx' builds with their colour-matched wheel graphics.

The polycarbonate down tube guard is backed with foam to help protect the underlying carbon fiber. the bolt-on design is easily removed so that you can actually inspect the tube for damage, too: the polycarbonate down tube guard is backed with foam to help protect the underlying carbon fiber. the bolt-on design is easily removed so that you can actually inspect the tube for damage, too
The polycarbonate down tube guard is backed with foam to help protect the underlying carbon fiber. the bolt-on design is easily removed so that you can actually inspect the tube for damage, too: the polycarbonate down tube guard is backed with foam to help protect the underlying carbon fiber. the bolt-on design is easily removed so that you can actually inspect the tube for damage, too

The down tube is protected by a removable polycarbonate guard that's also backed with foam

Ibis says the new Mojo HD3 will start arriving in stores as soon as early December depending on model. Pricing and brief specifications are as follows (international pricing TBC):

Ibis Mojo HD3 frame with standard Fox Float CTD Kashima rear shock – US$2,900

Ibis Mojo HD3 frame with Cane Creek DBair Inline CS rear shock upgrade – US$2,960

Ibis Mojo HD3 Special Blend – US$3,950:

The ibis mojo hd 'special blend':
The ibis mojo hd 'special blend':

  • X-Fusion O2 RLX rear shock and 150mm-travel Sweep RL fork
  • Shimano Deore/SLX and Race Face Respond 2x10 drivetrain
  • Shimano SLX hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Stan's NoTubes ZTR Rapid wheelset
  • Ibis handlebar, stem, and seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XT – US$6,000:

The ibis mojo hd xt:
The ibis mojo hd xt:

  • Fox Float CTD Kashima rear shock and 150mm-travel RockShox Pike RCT3 fork
  • Shimano Deore XT and Race Face Turbine Cinch 2x1drivetrain
  • Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Stan's NoTubes ZTR Flow wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XT Werx Spec – US$7,400:

  • Cane Creek DBair Inline CS rear shock and 160mm-travel Fox 36 Float RC2 Kashima fork
  • Shimano Deore XT and Race Face Turbine Cinch 2x drivetrain
  • Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Ibis 741 carbon wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XO1 – US$6,200:

The ibis mojo hd xo1 with optional ibis 741 wheel upgrade:
The ibis mojo hd xo1 with optional ibis 741 wheel upgrade:

  • Fox Float CTD Kashima rear shock and 150mm-travel RockShox Pike RCT3 fork
  • SRAM XO1 1x11 drivetrain
  • Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Stan's NoTubes ZTR Flow wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XO1 Werx Spec – US$7,600:

  • Cane Creek DBair Inline CS rear shock and 160mm-travel Fox 36 Float RC2 Kashima fork
  • SRAM XO1 and Race Face Turbine Cinch 1x11 drivetrain
  • Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Ibis 741 carbon wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XTR 1x – US$6,500:

  • Fox Float CTD Kashima rear shock and 150mm-travel RockShox Pike RCT3 fork
  • Shimano XTR and Race Face Turbine Cinch 1x11 drivetrain
  • Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Stan's NoTubes ZTR Flow wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XTR 1x Werx Spec – US$7,900:

The ibis mojo hd xtr 1x werx:
The ibis mojo hd xtr 1x werx:

  • Cane Creek DBair Inline CS rear shock and 160mm-travel Fox 36 Float RC2 Kashima fork
  • Shimano XTR and Race Face Turbine Cinch 1x11 drivetrain
  • Shimano Deore XT hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Ibis 741 carbon wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XX1 – US$8,700:

The ibis mojo hd xx1:
The ibis mojo hd xx1:

  • Cane Creek DBair Inline CS rear shock and 160mm-travel Fox 36 Float RC2 Kashima fork
  • SRAM XX1 and Race Face Next SL 1x11 drivetrain
  • Shimano XTR hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Ibis 741 carbon wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

Ibis Mojo HD3 XTR 2x – US$9,200:

The ibis mojo hd xtr 2x:
The ibis mojo hd xtr 2x:

  • Cane Creek DBair Inline CS rear shock and 160mm-travel Fox 36 Float RC2 Kashima fork
  • Shimano XTR 2x11 drivetrain
  • Shimano XTR hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm front/160mm rear rotors
  • Ibis 741 carbon wheels
  • Ibis handlebar, Thomson stem, and KS LEV Integra dropper seatpost

For more information: www.ibiscycles.com

James Huang

Former Technical Editor, US
James was BikeRadar's US tech editor from 2007-2015.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Up in the Colorado high-country where the singletrack is still single, the dirt is still brown, and the aspens are in full bloom. Also, those perfect stretches of pavement where the road snakes across the mountainside like an artist's paintbrush.
  • Beer of Choice: Mexican Coke
  • Location: Boulder, CO, USA

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