Wolf Tooth's new B-RAD system will help you ditch the hydration pack

Endless possibilities in this bottle and accessory relocation system

The upgrade specialists at Wolf Tooth Components have devised a new modular storage system that allows riders to carry tubes, tools and additional water bottles on their bikes. 

The B-Rad system and forthcoming line of accessories are based around three lengths of slotted alloy plates dubbed B-Rad 2, 3 and 4
The B-Rad system and forthcoming line of accessories are based around three lengths of slotted alloy plates dubbed B-Rad 2, 3 and 4

Dubbed B-RAD for Bottle Relocation and Accessory Devices, the system mounts to your bike’s water bottle bosses.

The B-RAD 3 is targeted at endurance XC riders who want to carry a water bottle along with an inner tube and C02 inflator in the main triangle

The B-RAD system comes in two, three and four-slot versions to provide varying levels of adjustment. These slotted alloy rails retail for $17.95, $19.95 and $22.95 respectively. (UK and Australian buyers can use a direct currency conversion for all of Wolf Tooth’s products.)

One of the most interesting accessories is the Double Bottle system, which allows you to carry two water bottles side by side.

I could see this system being a hit with endurance mountain bikers as well as gravel riders. The Double Bottle add-on retails for $23.95.

In the seemingly never-ending pursuit of ways to get tools as well as water off riders’ backs, Wolf Tooth is also launching the B-RAD Strap Adapter. This two-inch-thick nylon strap can hold an inner tube, multi-tool or a compressible rain shell.

It consists of an alloy plate with a padded Velcro strap. It’s similar to The Piggy made by the UK–based 76 Projects we highlighted in last week’s 11spd new gear round-up.

The B-Rad Strap Adapter retails for $29.95.

How it all works together

The B-RAD 2 gives riders the ability to raise or lower their water bottle cages. Lowering the bottle cages on the downtube or seat tube is very useful for riders who run a partial frame bag on road and gravel bikes, as these cargo carriers often interfere with traditional bottle placement. 

The Wolf Tooth B-Rad 3 paired with the Strap Adapter
The Wolf Tooth B-Rad 3 paired with the Strap Adapter

According to Wolf Tooth's Brendan Moore, the B-RAD 3 is targeted at endurance cross-country riders who want to carry a water bottle along with an inner tube and C02 inflator in the main triangle. The B-RAD 3 with the Strap Adapter is akin to the SWAT storage system Specialized uses on some of its mountain bikes. 

The Wolf Tooth Double Bottle allows riders to hold two bottles in place of one
The Wolf Tooth Double Bottle allows riders to hold two bottles in place of one

The B-RAD 4 gives riders the ability to use the Double Bottle as well as the Strap Adapter for long-haul riding. 

Early impressions

The B-Rad 4 with the Strap Adapter and Double Bottle may appeal to endurance riders
The B-Rad 4 with the Strap Adapter and Double Bottle may appeal to endurance riders

To get some early impressions of the system I installed the 4-slot version of the B-Rad with the Strap Adapter and Double Bottle on a gravel bike.

It took some trial and error to hone in on a position for the bottles that didn’t rub the inside of my calves when pedaling out of the saddle.

Once I settled on the appropriate position for the Double Bottle, it was a welcome improvement to have access to three water bottles inside the main triangle.

Not that looks are everything, but the Double Bottle looks much less ridiculous than the bottle-bedecked gravel bike I raced at last year’s Dirty Kanza 200.

This is a system that I hope catches on. It’s like a Picatinny rail for cycling accessories with endless possibilities for customization.

More on the way

According to Wolf Tooth, this is the just tip of the proverbial iceberg; many more B-RAD compatible components are in development and will be launched this summer.

Josh has been riding and racing mountain bikes since 1998. Being stubborn, endurance racing was a natural fit. Josh bankrolled his two-wheeled addiction by wrenching at various bike shops across the US for 10 years and even tried his hand at frame building. These days Josh spends most of his time riding the trails around his home in Fort Collins, Colorado.
  • Discipline: Mountain, cyclocross, road
  • Preferred Terrain: Anywhere with rock- and root-infested technical singletrack. He also enjoys unnecessarily long gravel races.
  • Current Bikes: Trek Remedy 29 9.9, Yeti ASRc, Specialized CruX, Spot singlespeed, Trek District 9
  • Dream Bike: Evil The Following, a custom Moots 27.5+ for bikepacking adventures
  • Beer of Choice: PBR
  • Location: Fort Collins, CO, USA

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