A taste of American cyclo-cross, part 4

Granogue Cross: the toughest

We’re halfway through BikeRadar reporter, Kirsten Frattini’s seven race snapshot of the USA's most prominent 'cross events that will take place in 2010. We’ve already crisscrossed the nation giving you a good sense of the variety in the American discipline. Now, we head back to the eastern seaboard’s mid-Atlantic region for an iconic even: Granogue.

If you follow American ’cross you know Granogue. It’s instantly recognized by the DuPont Estate’s hulking water tower at the top of one of the courses run-ups. As advertized by promoters, Granogue Cross is often referred to as the crown jewel of the Mid Atlantic 'cross scene.

Granogue's infamous grounds and water tower

This year the organizers will host back-to-back UCI C2 level events that wrap through the historic grounds, offering two of the toughest courses in the country held on 16 and 17 October in Wilmington, Delaware.

"For me, Granogue is one of the best races in the county," said Tyler Wren (BOO Bicycles). "The races really test the completeness of the riders because all sorts of skill sets are required for that race. There is lots of climbing which means you have to have good fitness but there are also high-speed turns, really steep ride ups that some people have to run. There are rooted single tracks that almost makes you feel like you are riding a mountain bike course. It is challenging in every aspect that a 'cross race could be challenging."

Trebon took the win in 2009

Granogue Cross marks rounds five and six of the Mid Atlantic Cyclo-cross (MAC) series that begins at the Nittany Cross in Trexlertown, Pennsylvania and also includes the Charm City Cyclo-cross in Baltimore, Maryland; Whirlybird Cyclo-cross in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania; Beacon Cyclocross in Bridgeton, New Jersey; Highland Park Cross in Jamesburg, New Jersey; and the Super Cross Cup in Southampton, New York.

Ryan Trebon (Kona-FSA) and Georgia Gould (Team Luna) won their respective events last year at Granogue.

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