The Fontus Ryde and Airo self-filling water bottles turn air into water

The end of the mid-ride pit stop?

Imagine never running out of water because your bottle refills itself as you ride.

While it sounds like the stuff of science fiction, the science is very straightforward. Fontus, named after the Roman god of springs and wells, is a small startup developing a pair of self-filling water bottles that collect moisture from the air and condense it into drinkable water, allowing you to ride further (and perhaps putting some domestiques out of their jobs!)

The fontus ryde mounts to the top tube and turns water vapor in the air into drinkable water while you ride:
The fontus ryde mounts to the top tube and turns water vapor in the air into drinkable water while you ride:

The Fontus Ryde is powered by solar cells that cool a series of hydrophobic teeth. As air moves over these teeth the temperature of the air drops, causing water vapor in the air to condense into water droplets. The droplets run down the teeth and are collected in the bottle.

The science behind the design is pretty straight forward. a solar panel is powers a series of cooling fins that condense water. it's the same process that occurs when water droplets form on the outside of a can or bottle when you take it out of your refrigerator :
The science behind the design is pretty straight forward. a solar panel is powers a series of cooling fins that condense water. it's the same process that occurs when water droplets form on the outside of a can or bottle when you take it out of your refrigerator :

The Ryde relies on the forward movement of the bicycle to push air through the condensing system. Presumably the speed of the rider could also have an effect on the rate condensation.

Fontus has also developed the Airo, a water bottle designed for hiking that could also be a hit with bikepackers. 

The fontus airo is a self-filling water bottle with a built-in fan to speed up water production:
The fontus airo is a self-filling water bottle with a built-in fan to speed up water production:

The Airo uses an integrated fan to speed up water production. It comes with a sleeve that doubles as a solar panel to recharge the fan and cooling system.

The airo has a sleeve that doubles as a solar panel to recharge the fan and cooling elements:
The airo has a sleeve that doubles as a solar panel to recharge the fan and cooling elements:

These bottles function best in conditions with high temperatures and high humidity. Fontus claims the bottles can harvest up to 0.5l of water per hour under optimal conditions.

The Ryde and Airo are still in development, so pricing and availability are unknown.

Learn more at fontus.at.

Josh Patterson

Tech Editor, US
Josh has been riding and racing mountain bikes since 1998. Being stubborn, endurance racing was a natural fit. Josh bankrolled his two-wheeled addiction by wrenching at various bike shops across the US for 10 years and even tried his hand at frame building. These days Josh spends most of his time riding the trails around his home in Fort Collins, Colorado.
  • Discipline: Mountain, cyclocross, road
  • Preferred Terrain: Anywhere with rock- and root-infested technical singletrack. He also enjoys unnecessarily long gravel races.
  • Current Bikes: Trek Remedy 29 9.9, Yeti ASRc, Specialized CruX, Spot singlespeed, Trek District 9
  • Dream Bike: Evil The Following, a custom Moots 27.5+ for bikepacking adventures
  • Beer of Choice: PBR
  • Location: Fort Collins, CO, USA

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