Giant 2010: Road and commuting highlights

Classy-looking tarmac bikes from the world's biggest bike company

We've already outlined the big changes to Giant's full-suspension mountain bikes for 2010, and shown you their new Trinity time trial bike and Omnium track frameset. As for the rest of their road and commuting lineup, it’s more a case of new specs and paintjobs than major redesigns, but if it ain't broke, why fix it?

TCR

The TCR Advanced and Advanced SL bikes have the same framesets as last year but new specs, colours and graphics, with more attention paid to the small details, like matching anodised hardware.

This year Giant are speccing their own Contact and Connect handlebars and stems across the range.

The top-end TCR Advanced SL 0 (£8,500) comes with Shimano’s Dura-Ace Di2 electronic groupset, Zipp 404 wheels and a Fizik Arione CX composite-rail saddle.

Further down the range, the SL 3 is based around the same carbon frame, with its integrated seatmast and massive MegaDrive down tube, but costs £5,000 less. It comes with 20-speed Ultegra 6700 and a Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheelset.

If you can't stretch to the Advanced SL range, there's always the standard Advanced models, which range from £1,950 to £3,250.

The £1,450 Alliance has an alloy/carbon-hybrid frame and comes with 20-speed Shimano 105, a Fizik Pave CX saddle and Shimano RS10 wheelset.

The alloy/carbon-hybrid TCR Alliance offers one-of-a-kind ride quality

For 2010, Giant have paid a lot of attention to cosmetics, with plenty of colour-matched parts

Trinity

We gave you a look at the Trinity time trial bike during the Tour de France. Well, now it’s available to buy. The top-end SL 0 model with Dura-Ace Di2 and Zipp 808/Sub 9 wheelset will set you back a cool £9,500 but there’s also a lower spec model for lesser mortals, and an alloy-framed option with some of the same features.

The carbon Trinity Advanced SL2 is specced with training wheels to keep the price down

The carbon Trinity Advanced SL2 at £4,750 comes with a full Ultegra 6700 groupset. To keep the price down it's specced with a set of training wheels – Giant's Carbon Matrix SL Aeros – but it features the same AeroDrive integrated cockpit system as the top-end bike.

The alloy-framed 0 brings Trinity performance down to a more affordable price

The alloy Trinity 0 comes in at a more wallet-friendly £1,450, with an aero frame made of Giant's AluxX SL aluminium, 20-speed Shimano 105 (Ultegra rear derailleur) and Michelin Lithion 2 tyres.

Defy

Slotting in below the TCR range, the sportive-ready Defy bikes look like good options. Again, the main change for 2010 is new colour schemes and improved specs.

The alloy/carbon-hybrid Defy Alliance looks particularly tasty, with its tapered OverDrive head tube (1 1/4 -1 1/8) and oversize PowerCore press-fit bottom bracket structure.

The Defy Alliance is lighter, stiffer and more comfortable than an aluminium bike

Pierre-Henri Medas, Giant’s global category manager for road bikes, says that when the Alliance models were first launched in 2005 they were closer to aluminium than carbon in terms of performance, but that has now been reversed and the new frames offer the perfect blend of light weight, stiffness and comfort for the price.

TCX

The TCX cyclo-cross range also boasts new specs and colours for 2010. The £1,650 TCX 0 sports a 46/36 compact chainset developed with FSA, 20-speed Ultegra 6700 and Mavic Aksium Race wheels. The cheaper £750 TCX 2 comes with a race-ready nine-speed spec, but would also make an excellent off-season commuter.

The TCX 2 'cross bike is race-ready but would also make a great winter commuter

Rapid and Dash

Giant say flat-barred road bikes are becoming increasingly popular, and to address this they have developed their new Rapid men’s model and Dash women’s bike.

Pierre-Henri said: “Instead of just taking a road frame and speccing a flat bar – which is a mistake because then the position isn’t right – we’ve designed a new frame that’s light, stiff and great to ride.”

The new Giant Rapid has been designed from scratch as a flat-barred road bike

The frame is longer to compensate for the shorter cockpit provided by a flat bar and comes in six sizes. It has eyelets for racks and mudguards, and extra clearance under the fork crown.

The Dash features a similar frame that has been built with a different geometry to fit women’s proportions, plus parts that have been sized to fit.

Fixies

No-one's 2010 range would be complete without a handful of fixed gear bikes and Giant have three for your perusal – the Bowery '72 and FMX, and the women's Chixie (geddit?).

The '72 is named after the year the company was founded and boasts an appropriately retro look, with drop bars, old-school graphics and chrome highlights. RRP is £450.

The '72, named after the year of Giant's 'birth'

The FMX has more of a BMX influence, with a 'no-rail' saddle, three-piece crankset, riser bar, top tube protector and flip-flop rear hub.

The Bowery FMX takes its design cues from the world of small-wheeled racing

There’s also the Chixie, which Giant claim is the first production fixie for women. It features high-rise 'cafe bars', track-inspired geometry and vivid blue rims, saddle and grips.

Feeling blue about the lack of fixies for women? Not any longer!

Related Articles

Comments

Back to top