Headcam cyclists in media spotlight

Footage used as evidence to obtain conviction

Headcams and cyclists have made a couple of recent media appearances. In the first case a York cyclist has been highlighting how she believes wearing a headcam is an important safety aid for cyclists, whilst the second case involves the first time that 'private' headcam evidence has been used to obtain a criminal conviction – and it happened against a cyclist.

Sue Archer regularly cycles around York with an ATC200 headcam fixed to the top of her helmet (she first heard about the idea on the Cycling Plus forum). Sue appeared on a regional BBC TV report to promote the benefits of the headcam – whilst it has potential use should she be involved in an accident, she feels it is also an important safety aid as it makes motorists think twice about how they drive when around her.

"I use the camera both for fun and as a regular feature of my commute and my day to day riding," she told BikeRadar.

Sue has a couple of options if she records an example of cycle-unfriendly driving: "I either post it on YouTube with captions explaining what the driver did wrong – so at least others can learn from it – or I could present it as evidence to the police."

Fortunately for Sue, she’s never felt the need to do the latter – partly, she says, because of the deterrent effect of her trusty headcam.

"If motorists realise that we aren’t so easily bullied they might get the message and behave more thoughtfully," she said.

Elsewhere, Salford was the scene for the first use of private headcam footage to secure a criminal conviction when cyclist Darren Ingham received a two-year supervision order after pleading guilty to a racially aggravated public order offence at Manchester Crown Court.

The incident involved Mr Ingham cycling up to two privately employed traffic wardens and racially abusing one then threatening the other. One of the wardens was equipped with a headcam and the footage was used by police to trace and convict Mr. Ingham.

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