HOLUX GPSport 260 GPS units - First look

Lightweight bike computers from Taiwan

Established in 1994, Holux specialise in satellite navigation equipment for motorists and outdoor sport enthusiasts. We haven't seen their bike-mountable GPS units before, but a pair have just arrived in the office for testing and they look promising.

The green GPSport 260 and its ANT+ 2.4G compatible bigger brother, the yellow GPSport 260 PRO, are aimed at the same market as the highly successful Garmin Edge 500, with all the features you'd expect of a top-end GPS-enabled cycle computer, but no mapping. They come in substantially cheaper, though, at £86.51 and £101.38, respectively – half the price of the Garmin.

Weighing 84g, the HOLUX unit measures 85.3 x 50.5 x 21.2mm and has a 128x128 pixel monochrome screen. It's controlled using two buttons and a central joystick. The display shows speed, time, altitude, distance, calorie consumption and direction. 260 PRO users can expand its capabilities with cadence (£21.62) and heart rate sensor (£33.80) add-ons.

The 260's MTK chipset is said to provide a GPS fix in under 36 seconds, even in built-up areas. It has 4GB of internal memory, so you can save ride data and route points. Claimed life of the 1050mAh lithium-ion battery is 20 hours, with a full charge taking five hours.

Rather than being cycling-specific, the device is designed for a variety of outdoor activities such as walking and fell running, and has separate modes according to what you’re doing. It does comes with a handlebar mount though, which is attached via zip-ties. Also included in the box is a storage pouch, USB and mains chargers, and ezTour route planning software.

Cycling Plus magazine will be putting the HOLUX GPSport 260 to the test over the next few weeks – look out for a review in the mag soon. For more information about the device, visit the website of UK distributors Selwyn Sport.

The full holux gpsport260 kit: the full holux gpsport260 kit

The standard HOLUX GPSport260 kit; cadence and heart rate add-ons are available for the PRO version

After early cycling flirtations with the Tour de France on childhood holidays, John Whitney fell for it hook, line and sinker in his mid-20s as an escape from the more sedate sports of his youth. As a classically trained news reporter, he snagged his dream job as a cycling writer straight out of college and is now fully immersed in the industry and wouldn't have it any other way.
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