Interbike: GT causing a Ruckus in 2010

Plus new Sensor trail bikes

GT is taking the lessons learned from the development of its innovative Fury downhill bike and applying them to the freeride crowd with the introduction of its new Ruckus 7. 

Unlike the carbon fibre Fury, the Ruckus 7 will use aluminium construction at both ends including a monocoque front triangle and a heavily shaped swingarm. 

Seven inches of rear wheel travel will be on tap courtesy of GT's Independent Drivetrain concept, whose recently updated (and easier to service) linkage system is wholly lifted from the Fury. 

Naturally, the fork will use a 20mm thru-axle and the rear dropouts will use RockShox's 150mm-wide Maxle standard. A 1.5" head tube will also be included for use with either the latest crop of single-crown long-travel forks or even a dual-crown if desired. 

The front triangle features monocoque construction and some nice-looking graphics.:
The front triangle features monocoque construction and some nice-looking graphics.:

The front triangle features monocoque construction and some nice-looking graphics.

Down below, Truvativ's HammerSchmidt FR transmission will offer single-ring security matched to two-ring versatility.

Final spec on the Ruckus 7 is still to be determined and consumers won't be able to buy one until spring 2010. Target price is US$3,999.

Also new from gt in 2010 is the 5
Also new from gt in 2010 is the 5

Also new from GT in 2010 is the 5" Sensor trail bike platform with a lower leverage ratio than its predecessor for better suspension performance.

Also new from GT is the 5" Sensor family of trail bikes with new aluminium front and rear ends, the Independent Drivetrain suspension system, and the same simplified pivot layout as found on the rest of GT's latest models for faster maintenance and reduced chance of creaking. 

Prices will range from US$1,799 to US$2,999.

For all of BikeRadar's Interbike coverage, click here.

You can follow BikeRadar on Twitter at twitter.com/bikeradar.

James Huang

Technical Editor, US
James started as a roadie in 1990 with his high school team but switched to dirt in 1994 and has enjoyed both ever since. Anything that comes through his hands is bound to be taken apart, and those hands still sometimes smell like fork oil even though he retired from shop life in 2007. He prefers manual over automatic, fizzy over still, and the right way over the easy way.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Up in the Colorado high-country where the singletrack is still single, the dirt is still brown, and the aspens are in full bloom. Also, those perfect stretches of pavement where the road snakes across the mountainside like an artist's paintbrush.
  • Beer of Choice: Mexican Coke
  • Location: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Back to top