NAHBS 2013: Gaulzetti Cicli

Massachusetts company expands for 2013

Gaulzetti Cicli made its name with aggressive, TIG-welded aluminum road racing bikes but the Massachusetts company is now expanding to steel and 'cross for 2013.

The new Cabrón disc-equipped cyclocross machine is highly similar to Gaulzetti's bread-and-butter Corsa road racer, using the same TIG-welded Dedacciai tubeset and the company's now-trademark integrated seatpost plus a 44mm-diameter head tube, PF30 bottom bracket shell, and new semi-hooded dropouts that are all machined in-house. As on the Corsa, Gaulzetti says the Cabrón's ride is on the firm side but in his opinion, its purpose-built intentions as a race bike means someone should only be riding it for about an hour at a time, anyway.

Retail price for the frameset is identical to the Corsa: US$2,999 including an Enve Composites fork.

Gaulzetti has also expanded into steel frames, however, for those seeking a smoother ride. The new Cazzo is TIG-welded with Columbus PegoRichie and features geometry alterations similar to what we frequently see at Paris-Roubaix: a slightly longer wheelbase, a slacker head tube angle, and a lower bottom bracket, all of which is intended to tone down the reflexes in addition to the road feel. Gaulzetti also builds the Cazzo with a straight 1 1/8" front end instead of a tapered one.

Retail price is US$2,899 with an Enve Composites fork.

The corsa aluminum road bike is craig gaulzetti's bread and butter machine, offering an apologetically firm ride he says is purpose-built for racing: the corsa aluminum road bike is craig gaulzetti's bread and butter machine, offering an apologetically firm ride he says is purpose-built for racing
The corsa aluminum road bike is craig gaulzetti's bread and butter machine, offering an apologetically firm ride he says is purpose-built for racing: the corsa aluminum road bike is craig gaulzetti's bread and butter machine, offering an apologetically firm ride he says is purpose-built for racing
The aluminum Corsa is Gaulzetti's bread-and-butter machine

James Huang

Technical Editor, US
James started as a roadie in 1990 with his high school team but switched to dirt in 1994 and has enjoyed both ever since. Anything that comes through his hands is bound to be taken apart, and those hands still sometimes smell like fork oil even though he retired from shop life in 2007. He prefers manual over automatic, fizzy over still, and the right way over the easy way.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Up in the Colorado high-country where the singletrack is still single, the dirt is still brown, and the aspens are in full bloom. Also, those perfect stretches of pavement where the road snakes across the mountainside like an artist's paintbrush.
  • Beer of Choice: Mexican Coke
  • Location: Boulder, Colorado, USA
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