Robin Williams recovering from heart surgery

US actor, comedian and avid cyclist okay

Two well-known cycling pals will be out of commission the next few weeks, as US actor, comedian and avid cyclist Robin Williams was recovering from  heart surgery at an Ohio clinic on Monday, the same day his good friend Lance Armstrong broke his collar bone in a Spanish road race.

The 57-year-old Williams, who starred in Good Will Hunting, Good Morning, Vietnam, and the television sitcom Mork & Mindy, had surgery to replace his aortic valve, repair his mitral valve, and correct an irregular heart beat, a statement from his publicist said. Williams reportedly owned 60 custom bicycles prior to his 2008 divorce from second wife.

"Williams' operation went extremely well and we expect him to make a full recovery," said Marc Gillinov, a cardiothoracic surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic where the Oscar winning actor was being treated.

After the three-hour-plus procedure Gillinov said Williams was expected to make a full recovery in the next eight weeks.

"His heart is strong and he will have normal heart function in the coming weeks with no limitations on what he'll be able to do," Gillinov said.

Williams had postponed his stand-up comedy tour "Weapons of Self-Destruction" to go into surgery, but his publicist Mara Buxbaum said the tour would begin anew this autumn.

According to a statement, after the operation Williams joked he had "some great new material for the tour," adding that he could not wait to get back on the road.

"I'm thinking the next leg of the tour will be 'Weapons of Self-Destruction and Reconstruction'," he is said to have quipped.

Armstrong is back in Austin, Texas to prepare for surgery on his collar bone. His Astana team manager has said Armstrong's break won't prevent him from racing the 2009 Tour de France, and may not even impede the Texan's plans to race his first Giro d'Italia May 9 - 31. Most broken collar bones take four to six weeks to heal, depending on the severity of the break.

© BikeRadar & AFP 2009

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