Paniagua EPO coffee - Just in

Controversially named caffeine for cyclists

This morning, BikeRadar received a 250g package of EPO… No, not so fast – it's actually a controversially named variety of coffee from Paniagua, a company based in Somerset, UK. 

The name Paniagua comes from the Spanish term 'pan y agua', which translates to 'bread and water' – a phrase used in professional cycling to identify riders who aren't doping. The term was brought to the fore by confessed doper Tyler Hamilton in his tell-all book The Secret Race.

EPO coffee is handcrafted using a cast iron Probat roaster, by award-winning artisans Extract Coffee Roasters. The 100 percent Arabica goods are said to be ethically sourced and feature a blend of Brazilian Daterra and Costa Rican beans honey-processed to deliver a sweeter and fruitier taste – "sweeter than a solo breakaway on the Ventoux" as Paniagua put it.

Described as "premium gear" it certainly isn't cheap; for £7.50 you get just 250g of either espresso grind or whole beans. 

Before long we made a blend of EPO in our faithful office cafetiere and shared it between a team of coffee connoisseurs (and one sceptical tea drinker). Feedback was unanimously positive as far as taste was concerned, but we suspect the price tag will make EPO a treat rather than a habit for most.

Standard testing procedure in the BikeRadar office

Cycling screenprints

Paniagua also sell a range of retro screenprints, featuring artwork derived from famous riders and historic races. As something a little different for your walls you can choose between four different designs based on the Tour and Giro jerseys of Coppi and Merckx. Each print is A2 sized and finished on heavyweight paper, and will set you back £20. 

An A1 fine art print is also available, with artwork based on the jersey worn by Eddy Merckx when he was determined World Champion back in 1974. It's yours for £40.

Merckx World Championships '74 print

Check out each print in our image gallery.

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