2015 road clothing - an Interbike gallery

From new-school Assos to old-school Italian to a new custom SpeedShop Program

At the Interbike tradeshow in Las Vegas, road clothing companies gave a preview of next season's styles, fabrics and trends. BikeRadarspent two days walking the halls to bring you the highlights.

Giordana

Giordana's new FRC line employs longer, svelte sleeves than prior editions, with compressive leg grippers that use technology borrowed from the medical-garment world. The FRC jersey uses an "I-Beam" construction of two-way stretch fabric (in black) to strengthen the pockets while the rest of the jersey material is a four-way stretch, breathable mesh (in red).

The frc jersey uses an
The frc jersey uses an

Santini

In a departure from typical road style, Santini has a 3/4-length jersey called the Photon, made with carbon particles in the mesh underarms for their anti-bacterial and anti-static properties.

Santini has a 3/4-length jersey called the photon: santini has a 3/4-length jersey called the photon
Santini has a 3/4-length jersey called the photon: santini has a 3/4-length jersey called the photon

Santini has a new women's collection, done with Australian track racer Anna Meares. The 33 Jersey is named for Meares' world record 500m time of 33 seconds. It has five pockets, including the two little ones on the sides.

Santini's new one-panel Racer bib shorts have but a single stitch up the inside of the leg. There is no added silicone or elastic, as the entire legs are compressive and designed to stay in place without any grippers. Santini calls the fabric Onda ('wave' in Italian), as it has alternating thicknesses of Lycra.

Santini's new one-panel bib shorts have but a single stitch up the inside of the leg. there is no added silicone or elastic, as the entire legs are compressive and designed to stay in place without any grippers: santini's new one-panel bib shorts have but a single stitch up the inside of the leg. there is no added silicone or elastic, as the entire legs are compressive and designed to stay in place without any grippers
Santini's new one-panel bib shorts have but a single stitch up the inside of the leg. there is no added silicone or elastic, as the entire legs are compressive and designed to stay in place without any grippers: santini's new one-panel bib shorts have but a single stitch up the inside of the leg. there is no added silicone or elastic, as the entire legs are compressive and designed to stay in place without any grippers

Bellwether

On the more affordable end of the spectrum, Bellwether has jerseys and bibs with heat-deflecting materials. The inside layer of the Bellwether Forza bibs have polymers (in circles below) that react with moisture to lower surface temperature. And the company also uses ColdBack in some of its garments to lower temperature, as well as something it calls CoolTemp, which acts similarly but is embedded in the fabric fibre instead of an external treatment.

The bellwether forza bibs have polymers (the circles) that react with moisture to lower surface temperature: the bellwether forza bibs have polymers (the circles) that react with moisture to lower surface temperature
The bellwether forza bibs have polymers (the circles) that react with moisture to lower surface temperature: the bellwether forza bibs have polymers (the circles) that react with moisture to lower surface temperature

Assos

Assos has new thermal bibs called the Tiburu based on the S7 shorts that launched last year. They use a waffle thermal fabric called 610.RX. The Tiburu thermal bibs have a windproof crotch, with a water-resistant treatment on the entire short.

Assos has new thermal bibs based on the s7 shorts that launched last year. they use a waffle thermal fabric called 610.rx: assos has new thermal bibs based on the s7 shorts that launched last year. they use a waffle thermal fabric called 610.rx
Assos has new thermal bibs based on the s7 shorts that launched last year. they use a waffle thermal fabric called 610.rx: assos has new thermal bibs based on the s7 shorts that launched last year. they use a waffle thermal fabric called 610.rx

POC

POC is expanding its clothing with more performance-minded pieces. POC has two lines, the AVIP safety line with bright colors, and the performance line with racer-inspired pieces.

POC is expanding its clothing with more performance-minded pieces: poc is expanding its clothing with more performance-minded pieces
POC is expanding its clothing with more performance-minded pieces: poc is expanding its clothing with more performance-minded pieces

Pearl Izumi

After years of SpeedShop being a pro-only line, Pearl Izumi announced at Interbike that it will sell SpeedShop items as custom to clubs and teams.

After years of speedshop being a pro-only line, pearl izumi announced at interbike that it will sell speedshop items as custom to clubs and teams: after years of speedshop being a pro-only line, pearl izumi announced at interbike that it will sell speedshop items as custom to clubs and teams
After years of speedshop being a pro-only line, pearl izumi announced at interbike that it will sell speedshop items as custom to clubs and teams: after years of speedshop being a pro-only line, pearl izumi announced at interbike that it will sell speedshop items as custom to clubs and teams

De Marchi

De Marchi has two lines - a retro line that draws heavily from the company's heritage, and a modern line. De Marchi's parent company is CyTech, the giant company that makes chamois pads for many clothing brands.

De marchi's retro line uses modern fabrics with old-school design: de marchi's retro line uses modern fabrics with old-school design
De marchi's retro line uses modern fabrics with old-school design: de marchi's retro line uses modern fabrics with old-school design

Pella

Pella has licensed the CinZano name. The Pella CinZano wool bibs have a synthetic under-layer for better moisture management.

Pella has licensed the cinzano name : pella has licensed the cinzano name
Pella has licensed the cinzano name : pella has licensed the cinzano name

Ben Delaney

US Editor-in-Chief
Ben has been writing about bikes since 2000, covering everything from the Tour de France to Asian manufacturing to kids' bikes. The former editor-in-chief of VeloNews, he began racing in college while getting a journalism degree at the University of New Mexico. Based in the cycling-crazed city of Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two kids, Ben enjoys riding most every day.
  • Discipline: Road (paved or otherwise), cyclocross and sometimes mountain. His tri-curious phase seems to have passed, thankfully
  • Preferred Terrain: Quiet mountain roads leading to places unknown
  • Current Bikes: Scott Foil Team Issue, Specialized S-Works Tarmac, Priority Eight city bike... and a constant rotation of test bikes
  • Dream Bike: A BMC Teammachine SLR01 with disc brakes and clearance for 30mm tires (doesn't yet exist)
  • Beer of Choice: Saison Dupont
  • Location: Boulder, CO, USA

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