Foundry Flyover Force 1 first ride review

Titanium race rig for an hour of pain

Dreaming of crisp days, changing leaves and the drone of half-drunk people screaming and clanking cowbells while you turn yourself inside-out covered in mud and sweat? There's a very good chance Foundry's Flyover Force 1 is right there with you. The Flyover wants to race cyclocross. That's all it wants to do.

Foundry's Flyover is a purpose-built titanium cross race bike
Foundry's Flyover is a purpose-built titanium cross race bike

Foundry Flyover Force 1 spec overview

  • 3Al/2.5V titanium frame
  • Whisky 9 CX carbon fork
  • DT Swiss R23 wheels: 15x100mm front, 12x142mm rear
  • Clement MXP, 700x33c
  • SRAM Force 1, 40x11-32
  • SRAM Force hydraulic disc brakes
  • Zipp stem, bar, post
  • Fizik Aliante Delta saddle 
  • XX-Small - X-Large sizing

Foundry Flyover Force 1 ride impression

Before even riding the Flyover, Foundry's intentions are pretty dang clear. The only braze-ons are for water bottle cages, there's nothing for racks or fenders or any other pedestrian comforts or utilities. The frame is clean and uncluttered, the carbon Whisky fork has broad legs, and both ends of the bike are tied together with thru-axles. 

The ride reaffirmed that no-nonsense appearance. My route had me taking off down a paved hill. First things first, putting energy into the Force's single-ring crank was immediately rewarded with surging forward motion. Holeshots look out, this cross machine seriously wants that first corner. 

A stout carbon fork is there to keep the front-end tracking true
A stout carbon fork is there to keep the front-end tracking true

At speed, the handling was sharp, and apparent that it was ready and willing to cut if I wasn't on it. Clearly this is a race bike made for dicing it up and banging elbows and bars. However, riding the Flyover wasn't pure hard-edged aggression. The titanium did take the sting out of bumps and hits, but still wasn't as muted as a high-end carbon bike. It didn't display any titanium softness or flex. 

Up front, the Whisky fork strikes a confident pose with massive fork legs, and backs it up with sure handling. I ventured off the pavement and into the trees which consisted of mostly woodchips, dirt, and grass. The Whisky fork didn't miss a beat, charging through whatever I pointed it towards with zero flex or wiggle. The 15mm thru-axle surely helped out. Also kudos to Foundry and Whisky for sticking to 15mm and not using 12mm, which is seen on road and other cross bikes (3mm can't save that much weight!).

A threaded bottom bracket is always a welcome sight, especially on a bike made for sloppy conditions
A threaded bottom bracket is always a welcome sight, especially on a bike made for sloppy conditions

Throughout the ride, SRAM's Force 1 drivetrain worked with trademark solid shifting, as did the Force disc brakes with smooth, controlled power that was easy to ramp up with a little more lever squeeze. The DT Swiss wheels didn't feel overly zippy, but were stiff and likely up to abuse as most DT Swiss items tend to be. 

Foundry says this is a cyclocross race bike. After this first ride I agree. The Flyover clearly wants speed and will grant it to those focused and prepared enough to maximize it.

Foundry Flyover Force 1 pricing and availability

$4,695 and in stock now, UK and Australian pricing not available.

Slender stays only give the appearance of compliance, they're plenty stiff and responsive
Slender stays only give the appearance of compliance, they're plenty stiff and responsive

Foundry Flyover Force 1 vs. the competition

It's super common for cyclocross bikes to be lumped into the do-it-all category. People use them for commuting, winter training, gravel riding, basically anything deemed too nasty, dirty or tough for their high zoot road bike. While the Flyover could handle those rides, its real purpose is for racing cyclocross.

And where it differs from its competition is that it's made from titanium whereas most race bikes are carbon. The titanium frame does have a unique ride quality and will likely never wear out, but it does weigh more than carbon. 

Russell Eich

Tech Writer
Russell fell head over heels in love with bikes in the '90s, and has been involved in the bike industry ever since. Between wrenching in bike shops, guiding professionally, and writing about bikes, Russell has honed an appreciation for what works, gained knowledge of what doesn't, and can barely contain his enthusiasm for what comes next. His two-wheeled passion continues in the Rocky Mountains high above Boulder, Colorado.
  • Age: 38
  • Height: 6'3"/190cm
  • Weight: 175lb/79kg
  • Waist: 34in/86cm
  • Chest: 42in / 107cm
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: High altitudes, forgotten singletracks, bike parks, roads without cars
  • Current Bikes: Custom Meriwether steel hardtail, Specialized S-Works Enduro 29, Kona Jake the Snake, Trek 69er, and a bunch more
  • Dream Bike: Yeti SB5c, Intense Tracer 275C, Black Cat custom road
  • Beer of Choice: Gin + Tonic
  • Location: Rollinsville, CO, USA

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