Storck Scenero G2 £1999.99

Fast race bike with great spec

BikeRadar score 4.5/5

Storck are a German brand whose bikes are rarely found wanting – especially if you like it hard and fast. The Scenero G1 took top spot in the 2011 Cycling Plus Bike of the Year chart, and Storck told us that the 2013 model was simply an update to improve internal cable routing and electronic drivetrain compatibility. That was understating things just a little, and the bike is one of our top five contenders for the 2013 title…

Tech ed Warren Rossiter talks through the Scenero G2

Ride & handling: Powerful, sharp and precise

The Scenero of two years ago was a sublime ride, but if something can be more sublime – sublimer perhaps – then this is it. The Scenero’s balance of stiffness in the right places means that any increase in cadence is instantly rewarded with hyper-speed acceleration momentum. Every watt of your power seems to be directly delivered to the rear wheel, pushing you forward, fast.

Power is, of course, nothing without control, and the G2 handles with a dizzying blend of sharpness and precision – a minimum twitch of your body and the lightest touch on the bar results in a point-and-shoot response that makes you feel like a hero even if you’re just turning into your drive. 

Credit here to the awesome Stiletto fork – it’s laterally stiff but it kills vibration and chatter from the road. The Scenero holds its line with absolute dedication and changes direction so fast from small inputs we reckon it’s the kind of bike a fighter pilot would nonchalantly lean up against his Typhoon.

Super-sized chainstays on the Scenero G2

This thing runs a fast jet close on ascents too. Okay, okay, that’s pushing the metaphor a bit far, but despite a mid-level spec elsewhere the Scenero’s achingly efficient frame makes up for any perceived kit shortcomings when the going goes up. 

On short, steep climbs the Scenero’s steep (parallel 73.5) angles and short wheelbase meant we could rarely resist standing up and attacking. For longer seated grinds the comfortable Prologo saddle and a clever seatpost keep things nice and comfy. 

A clever seatpost, we hear you ask? Why yes – Storck’s Comfort Carbon post uses a spiralled layup that enables it to flex fore-and-aft in a controlled manner. It adds a plushness that’s most welcome over rougher road surfaces.

That smart seatpost goes some way to explaining why, despite its telepathic handling and obvious racing potential, the Scenero is a very comfortable place to spend a day. 

Frame & equipment: Firm and light without a kit compromise

The frame achieves an impressive alchemy of outright speed and cushioning. Despite what Storck told us, every tube is new. Up front there’s a conical head tube to bolster stiffness and steering, the deep triangular down tube is a nod to aerodynamics, while the slender top flows into wishbone seatstays that bow outwards to unique carbon dropouts.

The asymmetric bottom bracket shell is compatible with the press-fit 86 standard. Its unique, curvaceous shape, say Storck, allows you to accommodate any crank you like, especially those with inbuilt power meters from the likes of SRM, SRAM or Rotor. The frame tips the scales at around 1,100g and in combination with the 360g fork it’s a very light chassis.

Storck have also managed to put together a component package that’s easily the equal of most of its competition – full Shimano 105 with no downgrades, Mavic’s Aksium/Aksion wheel/tyre combo and Storck finishing kit. The gearing combination of 50/34 and 12-25T cassette could be considered racy but the Scenero felt so adept we never noticed.

That flash of yellow can only mean one thing…

That said, the super-aggressive stance, sharpest of the sharp handling, and the long, low riding position won’t be everyone’s cup of tea. The more recreational or social sportive rider could be better placed with one of the Scenero’s rivals. If you love the feel of riding as rapidly as possible with handling that’s so instant it’s almost telepathic, you need to set up a Scenero.

This bike was tested as part of Cycling Plus magazine’s 2013 Bike Of The Year feature – read the full results in issue 273, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

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