Oakley’s lightest sports glasses yet: the EVZero

Frameless sunglasses with Prizm technology

A while back we told you about the Oakley Tombstone, a pair of frameless shooting sunnies we wanted for riding. As we lamented the lack of a frameless option designed for cycling, it seems the American optics giant did in fact something up their sleeve – the EVZero.

Back in the 90s Oakley released the original version of the Zero frame, which they claimed were the “lightest performance sunglasses in history.” Unfortunately they weren't particularly good looking, and were discontinued.

Oakley EVZero: their lightest sports glasses yet

The evzero range is claimed to weigh 24g, and we'd guess the lens is a similar size to the radarxl or radarev: the evzero range is claimed to weigh 24g, and we'd guess the lens is a similar size to the radarxl or radarev
The evzero range is claimed to weigh 24g, and we'd guess the lens is a similar size to the radarxl or radarev: the evzero range is claimed to weigh 24g, and we'd guess the lens is a similar size to the radarxl or radarev
The larger Range version of EVZero looks perfect for road cyclists

We couldn’t dig up how much the original Zero weighed but this new version, available in the Path and slightly larger Range lens shapes, is claimed to weigh a feathery 22g and 24g respectively — lighter than the Spy Daft (28g) and the Smith Pivlock Arena Max (29g). Long-established roadie favourite the Oakley Radar Path weighs 30g.

The EVZero also gets Road and Trail versions of the Prizm lens, Oakley's newest optic technology where special tints are used to block specific spectral peaks and colour wavelengths to enhance contrast, and improve clarity in a range of light conditions — there’s photochromic and standard lens options too.

Oakley EVZero: Distortion-free vision

The path lens shape is the smaller of the two and is claimed to weigh 22g. we'd guess it’s quite similar to the standard radar in terms of size: the path lens shape is the smaller of the two and is claimed to weigh 22g. we'd guess it’s quite similar to the standard radar in terms of size
The path lens shape is the smaller of the two and is claimed to weigh 22g. we'd guess it’s quite similar to the standard radar in terms of size: the path lens shape is the smaller of the two and is claimed to weigh 22g. we'd guess it’s quite similar to the standard radar in terms of size
Here's the Path variant of Oakley's new EVZero glasses, which'll likely prove popular with runners

The American outfit also points out the EVZero's lens is designed with "Polaric Ellipsoid geometry for maximised peripheral clarity in its sweeping field of view". Removing the marketing speak, this means vision should be distortion free, even near the edges of the lens.

Oakley EVZero: Features and price

Oakley has just released the new frameless evzero: oakley has just released the new frameless evzero
Oakley has just released the new frameless evzero: oakley has just released the new frameless evzero

There’s no indication as to whether the lenses (or arms rather) are interchangeable, a feature we’d happily trade a few grams for, but based on absence of replacement lenses on Oakley’s website we’d say they’re fixed.

The EVZero also sees slender earsocks made from Oakley's 'O-Matter', and no-slip 'Unobtainium' rubber on the nosepiece and temple tips to keep the sunnies securely attached to your face.

Available now, the EVZero will set you back $170/ £140 / AU$220 for the Prizm version, $190 / £170 / AU$270 for the photochromic, and $160 / £130 / AU$200 for the standard lens.

We’ve got a couple of pairs of EVZero’s on the way, so stay tuned for actual weights and a full review.

Colin Levitch

Staff Writer, Australia
Originally from Denver, Colorado, Colin now resides in Sydney, Australia. Holding a media degree, Colin is focused on the adventure sport media world. Coming from a ski background, his former European pro father convinced him to try collegiate crit racing. Although his bright socks say full roadie, he enjoys the occasional mountain bike ride, too.
  • Discipline: Road, mountain
  • Preferred Terrain: Tarmac mountain climbs into snow-covered hills
  • Current Bikes: BMC TeamMachine SLR01, Trek Top Fuel 9
  • Dream Bike: Mosaic Cycles RT-1
  • Beer of Choice: New Belgium La Folie
  • Location: Sydney, Australia

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