Airdrop Edit V1 Coil first ride review£2,999.00

Form over function

Airdrop says the Edit is all about keeping things simple and creating a bike that just works. Its lines are certainly less swoopy and more matter-of-fact than most of the machines we've tested recently, skewed towards function over form, which may not win the fashionistas over. But if you can look beyond the industrial outline, there are good things going on.

For starters, the angles feel great. The steep 76-degree seat angle improves the bike’s climbing prowess, especially when coupled with the stretched-out 640mm effective top tube of my large test bike.

A reach of just under 470mm, wheelbase of 1,220mm and head angle of 65.3 degrees make it a confident descender, while the 343mm bottom bracket height (10mm drop) improves cornering confidence.

Aim it down a rock-strewn mess of a downhill track and the Edit simply flies. Even at higher speeds, the fairly central rider positioning means direction changes and line corrections are a case of subtle weight shifts rather than drastically throwing yourself about each and every time the trail changes.

Spring in its step

The coil shock performed well
The coil shock performed well

The coil shock delivers a super-sensitive initial stroke that just keeps on gripping too. You’ll need to be patient with set-up — it took me a good few runs on different tracks to find a good all-round setting that I was happy with — and may need to buy a different weight spring, but once dialled in, the results are impressive.

It’s a shame there isn’t a Lyrik up front, instead of a Pike, because the traction and balance would be even better.

It was on trickier, more technical trails or when speeds dropped off that I started to become less enthusiastic about the Edit. That traction-grabbing suspension, while feeling totally planted, does lack some of the pop and dynamism of its air-sprung peers, which can quickly take the edge off your excitement.

Airdrop has just unveiled a revised frame, the Edit V2, with internal dropper post routing, a lower seat tube and more standover height. You’ll need to be careful with the rear brake hose routing though, as I had issues with it buzzing the tyre.

Early verdict

Not as agile or playful as some, but we like its planted feel and long/low/slack dimensions.

This article was originally published in Mountain Biking UK magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

Rob Weaver

Technical Editor-in-Chief, UK
Rob started riding mountain bikes seriously in 1993 racing cross-country, though he quickly moved to downhill where he competed all over the world. He now spends most of his time riding trail bikes up and down hills. Occasionally he'll jump into an enduro race.
  • Age: 34
  • Height: 172cm / 5'8"
  • Weight: 68kg / 150lb
  • Discipline: Mountain
  • Preferred Terrain: Natural trails where the loam fills my shoes on each and every turn
  • Beer of Choice: Guinness

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