Magura Vyron eLect dropper post first ride review£350.00

Are the wireless woes gone?

Magura's first Vyron dropper post made headlines for being wireless but also for being difficult to use and unreliable with a delayed action. The updated Vyron eLect keeps the wireless uniqueness but looks to improve on the issues. 

Magura Vyron eLect highlights

  • Wireless remote
  • Travel: 100, 125, 150mm (in for testing)
  • 2-bolt saddle head
  • NiMH battery with micro-USB port
  • Cycles per charge: 400 claimed
  • Claimed weight: 595g

Tucked under the saddle is the charge port, on/off switch, and secondary actuation button
Tucked under the saddle is the charge port, on/off switch, and secondary actuation button

Magura Vyron eLect smart remote

Sure, the remote makes the Vyron go up and down, but it also has two other buttons. For what? That was my question, too. 

Left- or right-side compatible, the wireless remote includes a cover to make hitting the dropper post button easier
Left- or right-side compatible, the wireless remote includes a cover to make hitting the dropper post button easier

Arrow-shaped buttons are included to control Magura's eLect fork and shock. It's a nice addition should you swap either of your bike's suspension units to a Magura electronically controlled unit.

To limit any confusion or searching for the (way too) small dropper post button, Magura includes a snap-on cover. So no matter how ham-fisted you are, tapping the correct dropper post button is as simple as can be.

Magura Vyron eLect installation

It should go without saying but installation was simple. For any rider who has to disassemble their bike frequently for whatever reason, the Vyron is a godsend. If you've ever run out of cuss words trying to fish a dropper cable through a frame, or getting the cable length just right, you'll understand the appeal. 

Side-to-side saddle movement was negligible, easily on par with the KS, Race Face and Bontrager party posts in the garage. A two-bolt head attaches the saddle, as it should on all posts.

A two-bolt head is standard, as it should be for all seatposts
A two-bolt head is standard, as it should be for all seatposts

Left- or right-side remote compatibility was also nice to see. The rubber O-ring to strap the remote to the bar was easy to install but not super tight. 

Charging the post via the micro-USB cable was straightforward with a full charge taking about three hours.

Magura Vryon first ride impressions

On the trail, the delay between pressing the remote and the seat actually moving took a few up and down cycles to understand. Once I figured out the timing, it was easy to slam the seat or pop it back up to full extension.

Tapping the remote still results in a little delay, I'd guess a quarter-second or so. If everything's quiet, you can hear the servo motor spin inside the post. The timing is almost similar to a RockShox Reverb with its minuscule delay after pushing the plunger remote.

Magura's Vyron eLect dropper post is the brand's second take on a wireless height-adjustable post
Magura's Vyron eLect dropper post is the brand's second take on a wireless height-adjustable post

What took more thought was setting the saddle height between the extremes of all the way up or down. Like any electronic device, but unlike any other dropper remote, a single touch is all that's needed. 

With the Vyron, a quick tap of the remote leaves the valve open for a window of time. That means you don't have to hold the button to keep the post moving. Once accustomed, I could see myself preferring it as I could rewrap my thumb under the bar and get on with riding. 

However, it worked the other way, too. If I didn't keep my butt on the saddle at the height I wanted, the post would return to full extension. I got caught out more than once with this and it took more time to get used to.

At either end of the stroke, there's a distinct clunk sound, which I appreciate. It's a reassurance that the post is either in party mode or in a pedal-ready position.

Lastly, I need to experiment with the air pressures as I found the return speed to be on the slow side. 

Magura Vyron eLect pricing

  • £350 / $499 / AU$690

Magura Vyron eLect early verdict

I've gotten a handful of rides on the Vyron but not enough time to have even depleted the initial battery charge. That said, after a bit of a learning curve, my first impressions are mostly positive, with the only outlier being having to hover my butt on the saddle until the servo closes. Besides that, the post has done everything I've asked of it with zero issues. 

Russell Eich

Tech Writer, US
Russell fell head over heels in love with bikes in the '90s, and has been involved in the bike industry ever since. Between wrenching in bike shops, guiding professionally, and writing about bikes, Russell has honed an appreciation for what works, gained knowledge of what doesn't, and can barely contain his enthusiasm for what comes next. His two-wheeled passion continues in the Rocky Mountains high above Boulder, Colorado.
  • Age: 39
  • Height: 6'3"/190cm
  • Weight: 175lb/79kg
  • Waist: 34in/86cm
  • Chest: 42in / 107cm
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: High altitudes, forgotten singletracks, bike parks, roads without cars
  • Current Bikes: Custom Meriwether steel hardtail, Specialized S-Works Enduro 29, Kona Jake the Snake, Trek 69er, and a bunch more
  • Dream Bike: Yeti SB5c, Intense Tracer 275C, Black Cat custom road
  • Beer of Choice: Gin + Tonic
  • Location: Rollinsville, CO, USA

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