Cube Stereo and Fritzz 2015 - exclusive first look

New shorter-travel Stereo and 180mm travel Fritzz, the 'ultimate super-enduro bike'

Last week we took a trip to Cube’s massive factory and offices in Waldershof, Germany, to take a look at the brand’s 2015 range.

We can’t tell you about the majority of the lineup for another week-and-a-half, but we can share all the details of the revamped Fritzz and Stereo bikes.

Stereo

The Stereo 160 650b is one of our favourite middle-wheelers of the last two years. The whole Stereo range has been updated for 2015, including the introduction of an entirely new 140mm (5.5in) travel 650b bike.

The 160mm (6.3in) travel 650b wheeled model and the 140mm travel 29er are now available in both carbon and aluminium versions. 

The 160mm travel 650b bike hasn't undergone any changes, but this isn't a bad thing. it's been one of our favourite bikes out there since it's launch two years ago:
The 160mm travel 650b bike hasn't undergone any changes, but this isn't a bad thing. it's been one of our favourite bikes out there since it's launch two years ago:

The 160mm travel 650b bike hasn't undergone any changes, but this isn't a bad thing. It's been one of our favourite bikes out there since its launch two years ago

But the big news is the new Stereo 140 650b. The frame has been designed around fast, manoeuvrable geometry, clocking a 67.5-degree head angle, and longer horizontal top tube lengths than typical throughout the sizes, which results in a stable ride. It also comes in both carbon and aluminium flavours.

The seat tube lengths have been slashed – the 18in frame size has a 400mm seat tube length despite the horizontal top tube length staying the same. The result is a lengthy ride that looks long and low, and makes the bike easy to throw around, especially on downhills with the saddle dropped low. 

The 140mm travel 650b stereo shown in another hpa (high performance aluminium) guise. this is the bike we rode, smashing it down a german downhill track for the day, testing just how far we could push the 140mm of travel:
The 140mm travel 650b stereo shown in another hpa (high performance aluminium) guise. this is the bike we rode, smashing it down a german downhill track for the day, testing just how far we could push the 140mm of travel:

The 140mm travel 650b Stereo shown in another HPA (High Performance Aluminium) guise. This is the bike we rode, smashing it down a German downhill track for the day, testing just how far we could push the 140mm of travel

We like that the reduced seat tube lengths increase sizing possibilities too, giving riders who like a longer top tube the chance to upsize without an impractical increase in frame height and standover height. We spent a lot of time on the Stereo 140, so look out for an in-depth First Ride review soon.

Fritzz

The Fritzz name is now reserved for a new 180mm travel, 650b-wheeled bump-eater, which we also got to test-ride in Germany. The frame’s design is similar to the new Stereo 140 – it takes the same, chopped-down seat tube lengths and combines them with an even longer top tube, a slacker (65.5-degree) head angle and 180mm (6.7in) of travel controlled by a Fox Float X CTD shock. It’s only available in aluminium.

The spec hasn't been held back on the top model of the fritzz 180, with a custom-tuned fox float x shock, raceface turbine cinch cranks and narrow/wide chainring, and sram x01 gearing setup:
The spec hasn't been held back on the top model of the fritzz 180, with a custom-tuned fox float x shock, raceface turbine cinch cranks and narrow/wide chainring, and sram x01 gearing setup:

Cube hasn't help back on the spec of the top model of the Fritzz 180. It has a custom-tuned Fox Float X Shock, Raceface Turbine Cinch cranks and Narrow/Wide chainring and SRAM X01 gearing setup

Even though the Fritzz boasts 180mm travel, the bike is still specced with a double chainring up front and has been pitched as the 'ultimate super-enduro bike', which can be pedaled up hills as well as smashed down them.

Pricing

Pricing is still to be finalised for the whole range, however we can expect similar price points to 2014 with all the aluminium bikes starting somewhere below £2,000, working up to around £6,000 for the high-spec carbon versions.

As soon as we can, we'll bring you more information on the rest of Cube’s 2015 range.

Freelance Writer, UK
Jake comes from a downhill background but now spends most of his time smashing shorter-travel trail and enduro bikes down those same downhill trails. He's well known for pushing components and gear to their limits, and a little further.
  • Discipline: Mountain
  • Preferred Terrain: Any type of razzing, anywhere, on any bike!
  • Beer of Choice: Cider! West country, like.

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