Best Mini Pumps for road cyclists

Out on the road and you puncture? You’ll need one of these little fellas...

Every cyclist’s home workshop should include a track pump – but there’s no way you’re going to be carrying one of these huge and heavy metal constructions whenever you’re out on a bike ride.

Not too long ago, roadies carried frame pumps strapped to their frames, usually right underneath the top tube. But the change in frame shapes and the rise of CO2 inflators have seen those largely vanish. Enter their miniature cousins come into play: the mini pump.

These are designed to be carried on your bike – usually mounted in a bracket under your bottle cage – though some are easily small enough for your back jersey pocket or seatpack. These very small pumps come with a big proviso, though: in our experience, the smaller the pump the less practical they are to use. Small, as your partner may already have told you, isn’t always beautiful.

A small pump will require more strokes to get your tyres up to a decent pressure to get you home in an emergency, and with a particularly tiny pump just wrapping both your hands around it to achieve a decent pumping action can prove tricky.

In this test we’ve tested some of the very smallest available as well as some of their slightly larger brethren.

At BikeRadar, many of us ride with a CO2 and an inflator head in case of a flat — with a mini pump only there as a final line of defense.

Topeak Roadie Dax

BikeRadar score4.5/5

Topeak Roadie Dax
Topeak Roadie Dax

  • Price: £23 / $22 / AU$40

This Presta-only pump has a dual action, which means it inflates on both strokes – albeit with a ‘kissing’ sound! Combine this with its long 26cm body and we got to around 60psi in 100 strokes and over 90psi by 160, though it was hard work by then. The press-on chuck feels secure, overall quality is good and weight is a reasonable 119g.

Blackburn Core

BikeRadar score4/5

Blackburn Core
Blackburn Core

  • Price: £35 / $40 / AU$60

Weighing 123g and 23cm long, this has a claimed maximum pressure of 90psi. The brushed aluminium-barreled Presta-only pump exudes quality, and it reached 80psi in 170 strokes. The ergonomics are good, the large screw-on chuck is solid and it’s good for low-pressure mountain bike tyres. It has a handy valve core tool for tubeless tyres.

Lezyne Lite Drive HP

BikeRadar score4/5

Lezyne Lite Drive HP
Lezyne Lite Drive HP

  • Price: £30 / $35 / AU$85

Unless you’ve got arms like The Hulk, you may struggle to reach the 160psi max, but we got to a very satisfactory 85psi in around 170 strokes. It has a reversible Presta/Schrader valve and the 14mm diameter internal shaft and 15cm stroke deliver a super-smooth action, though it heats up as the pressure mounts. It weighs 85g and is 23cm long.

Birzman Velocity Apogee

BikeRadar score4/5

Birzman Velocity Apogee
Birzman Velocity Apogee

  • Price: £30 /  $40 / AU$70

Birzman’s chunky push-on head works with Presta and Schrader valves – and links securely if enough Presta valve is visible. It weighs 104g and is 19cm long, but its 13cm stroke will get you to 60psi in around 170 quite easy strokes. It takes more effort after this but we reached over 90psi in 250 or so. Very good figures and a quality pump.

Flynt HP1.RD

BikeRadar score3/5

Flynt HP1.RD
Flynt HP1.RD

  • Price: £25 / $29 / AU$38 ( Check availability for delivery to USA and Australia )

A tough and well-made 99g pump, but the Flynt was not totally able to overcome its small size – 18cm long with a 12cm stroke. Compared with others, the reversible screw-on chuck didn’t feel as secure on Presta valves, and it took more of an effort to reach a decent pressure, 180 strokes to 50psi, and nearer 300 to reach 80psi.

FWE Aluminium

BikeRadar score2.5/5

FWE Aluminium
FWE Aluminium

  • Price: £10 / $12 / AU$15 ( Check availability for delivery to USA and Australia )

Small didn’t prove to be beautiful for this 86g, 17.5cm-long pump that has a secure push-on reversible head. After 220 strokes pumping up a 25mm tyre we’d reached around 70psi, which will get you home at a push. Getting closer to 90psi or more will require a lot of effort, and the 120psi max feels well out of reach for the less muscular rider.

This article was originally published in Cycling Plus magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

Simon has been cycling for as long as he can remember, and more seriously since his time at university in the Dark Ages (the 1980s). This has taken in time trialling, duathlon and triathlon and he has toured extensively in Asia and Australasia, including riding solo 2900km from Cairns to Melbourne. He now mainly rides as a long-distance commuter and leisure/fitness rider. He has been testing bikes and working for Cycling Plus in various capacities for nearly 20 years.
  • Discipline: Road, touring, commuting
  • Current Bikes: Rose SL3000, Hewitt steel tourer
  • Beer of Choice: Samuel Adams Boston Lager
  • Location: Bath, UK

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