Storck Scenero Disc review£2,549.00

Top-tier disc-equipped road bike

BikeRadar score4/5

Cast your gaze back but a few years and the very thought of a disc brake-equipped road bike would have been anathema. Now they’re 10 a penny.

Futureproof stopping

Okay, given the price of this Storck perhaps they’re not quite that common, but they’re certainly going to be part of the future. Even the never-knowingly forward-looking UCI has sanctioned their use in road races. So, what advantages do disc brakes have?

Related: Road disc brakes: everything you need to know

Well, quite a few. They may not win the low-weight battle, but when it comes to braking the discs have it – every time and in all conditions. They also enable the rim to do away with the braking track, leaving it free to concentrate on strength and aerodynamics, which greatly improves wheel lifespan.

The thru-axles and stem require a t25 tork key, and this is where it lives:
The thru-axles and stem require a t25 tork key, and this is where it lives:

The thru-axles and stem require a T25 Torx key, and this is where it lives

While disc brakes have found a natural home on gravel and endurance bikes, Storck’s Scenero is at the racier end of the road bike spectrum. Take a comparable Specialized Tarmac, for example, and while the steepish frame angles are similar, the Scenero is lower and longer at the front, with a shorter head tube.

The chainstays are also short – but that makes the tight rear end easy to throw about. However, larger-footed riders might want to check heel clearances with the beefy chainstays, and the frame won’t take rubber wider than our bike’s 28mm Schwalbe Ones.

The frame itself is genuinely chunky, with a massive tapered head-tube, huge down tube and sizeable bottom bracket shell with press-fit BB.

Front and rear thru-axles also make for a great connection with the wheels (the front axle neatly housing the required T25 Torx key). And though the seatstays are very thin where they join the seat tube, they quickly flare out further down in order to cope with the forces created by the disc brakes.

Efficient speed-merchant

The result is a fast-handling machine that majors in firmness and efficiency. The reasonably light wheels mean it climbs pretty well, while the disc brakes allow you to brake a little later on the declines. Power and control are there in abundance with minimal effort at the lever, while the slightly larger lever hoods offer a decent handhold.

The carbon bar is slightly swept-back with comfortable, slightly flattened tops and ‘pistol grip’ drops, though we’d have preferred thicker, plusher bar tape.

The scenero is up there with the best racy disc-equipped road bikes – just don't expect too much in the comfort stakes:
The scenero is up there with the best racy disc-equipped road bikes – just don't expect too much in the comfort stakes:

The Scenero is up there with the best racy disc-equipped road bikes – just don't expect too much in the comfort stakes

Gear shifts from the combination of Shimano 105 derailleurs and the hydraulic/STI levers isn’t quite as smooth as Ultegra, but any marginal deficiencies are more than made up for by the excellent braking from the Shimano hydraulic disc system with 160mm rotors.

The compact crankset and 11-28 cassette combo is well suited for fast riding over varied terrain. Meanwhile the tubeless-ready DT Swiss wheels feel very stiff, complementing the frame well.

The Scenero is a beautifully engineered bike, but one that definitely majors in performance rather than comfort. Good contact points and wide tyres help, but you’re always aware of the efficient beast beneath you.

If you like a ‘softer’ ride, the Scenero won’t be your scene, but as a speed-orientated disc-braked road bike it’s up with the top tier.

This article was originally published in Cycling Plus magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

Simon has been cycling for as long as he can remember, and more seriously since his time at university in the Dark Ages (the 1980s). This has taken in time trialling, duathlon and triathlon and he has toured extensively in Asia and Australasia, including riding solo 2900km from Cairns to Melbourne. He now mainly rides as a long-distance commuter and leisure/fitness rider. He has been testing bikes and working for Cycling Plus in various capacities for nearly 20 years.
  • Age: 53
  • Height: 175cm / 5'9
  • Weight: 75kg /165lb
  • Waist: 33in
  • Discipline: Road, touring, commuting
  • Current Bikes: Rose SL3000, Hewitt steel tourer
  • Beer of Choice: Samuel Adams Boston Lager
  • Location: Bath, UK

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