Fizik Aliante R1 Versus Evo review£160.00

Channelled saddle for endurance riders

BikeRadar score4/5

Comfortable and flexible hull, deep padding(Click the Edit Attributes/Cog button with cursor placed in this area to edit this tag.)

Fizik’s range used to be one of the simplest — you could choose from three saddles based on three levels of flexibility, and that was it. Over the last few years, though, the company has introduced two widths for every model, with the Versus also having (featuring a pressure-relieving channel) two versions.

First, there is the full-hole Open model, which features a stiffer hull for those concerned with power and speed (racers to you and me), and are also looking for a bit of pressure relief. 

Second, the Evo, as tested here, is a plushly padded saddle with a more flexible hull, designed to be the best companion for endurance riders.

The Aliante hasn’t suddenly transformed into a big and bouncy seat, but it’s significantly more compliant than a standard saddle

My test model is the wider 148mm Large version that weighs 188.7g, which is very light for such a richly upholstered saddle. I'm a fan of the Aliante in all its guises, and the Evo is no exception.

On the bike you can feel that bit of extra give and extra width. The Aliante hasn’t suddenly transformed into a big and bouncy seat, but it’s significantly more compliant than a standard saddle. So, if you’re in the market for a swoopy-shaped saddle, and want some additional comfort provided by the channel, this could be an ideal choice.

Where it outshines most others, though, is when you’re up on the nose. Here the extra padding and give mean you can spend more time putting down the power.

So, now that there are three options — the standard Aliante, the stiffened and open-holed, or the flexible, channelled Evo — which to go for? To be honest, the original Aliante is still a personal favourite, combining the classic comfortable shape with low weight. As I’ve never had any real issues with pressure it’s still my go-to saddle.

This article was originally published in Cycling Plus magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

Related Articles

Back to top