Worx 20v Max Hydroshot review£129.99

Impressively portable cleaning package

BikeRadar score4.5/5

The Worx Hydroshot fits somewhere between mains or petrol-powered washers and portable integrated units. Key to the design is the small, lightweight 20v motor, which is incorporated into the spray gun, and powered by the 2.0ah interchangeable lithium-ion battery.

The Hydroshot’s 6m long hose snaps on to the sprayer body and can take water from almost anywhere, with a filter to keep the supply clean, and a sliding float to control its depth.

My kit included a collapsible bucket, but you could use large screw-top containers, or any fresh water source, so long as its volume matches your intended task. A bottle cap connector allows most 2-litre drinks bottles to be directly attached, and the fitted hose connector can be replaced for use with your garden hose.

With up to 10 times the pressure of a garden hose, the Hydroshot strips mud from the filthiest bikes with ease

A 41.5cm extension lance can be used between the pistol grip body and multi-spray nozzle if required, otherwise there’s 36cm of spray gun ahead of your controlling hand, which is better when space or proximity is an issue.

The spray gun, nozzle and battery weigh 1,430g, becoming 159g heavier and a little more nose down with the extension attached.

The spray gun has high and low pressure settings, equating to 320psi/22bar and 94psi/6.5bar, giving projected working durations of 16 or 30 minutes with the 2.0ah battery, and a charge time of three hours, although the battery reaches 75 percent in an hour. If you're expecting a lot of use away from home, a spare or larger battery could be wise, because there’s no vehicle charger.

Current Worx users can also buy just the spray gun body more cheaply, and use their existing batteries, or 2.0ah and 4.0ah spares are available.

Flow rate is 150 litres/hour, so if you’re planning on a lot of washing, you’ll need a lot of water.

The multi-spray nozzle has a rotating head offering five alternate spray types, from a garden watering shower to 0-, 15-, 25- and 40-degree flat fan-shaped jets, which allow simple adjustment to suit your washing needs.

A thumb-operated safety button engages the large trigger, and one-handed spraying is easy. When starting, it can take around 30 seconds for the water to be pulled through the hose, but as long as the supply is consistent so is the output.

With up to 10 times the pressure of a garden hose, the Hydroshot strips mud from the filthiest bikes with ease, without compromising your bearings, and is useful for other household tasks, such as washing boots, windows or cars, where the hose length allows all-round access without moving the water container.

It wins on portability too, because its main components can be packed or hung in your vehicle within their mesh bag.

So far, I haven’t exhausted a 2.0ah battery in a session, managing to clean a couple of bikes. The bane of any portable washer is water supply, but the Hydroshot’s flexibility gives the roaming rider more options than most, and excellent cleaning power too.

Robin Wilmott

Tech Writer, Tech Hub, UK,
Robin began road cycling in 1988, and with mountain bikes in their infancy, mixed experimental off-road adventures with club time trials and road races. Cyclocross soon became a winter staple, and has remained his favourite form of competition. Robin has always loved the technical aspect of building and maintaining bikes, and several years working in a good bike shop only amplified that. Ten years as a Forensic Photographer followed, honing his eye for detail in pictures and words. He has shot at the biggest pro events since the '90s, and now he's here, drawing on all those experiences to figure out what makes a bike or component tick.
  • Age: 45
  • Height: 178cm / 5'10"
  • Weight: 75kg / 165lb
  • Discipline: Road, cyclocross, time trials
  • Beer of Choice: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

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