Hidden in plain sight, BH drops the G7 Pro

G7 platform now available with rim brakes

When BH launched the G7 in 2015 it was only available with disc brakes, making it one of the early aero disc bikes. This was great for those looking to upgrade to a race-ready disc roadie, but not so great for consumers less keen to make the switch or pro riders on BH sponsored teams with the UCI’s slow uptake of the technology.

For the past few weeks, BH has been hiding the new G7 Pro in plain sight under the Direct Energie team at this year’s Tour de France. The bike was also teased at this year’s EuroBike Demo days, although details were a bit slim. Now BH has lifted the veil on the new bike under the guise of the “Aero Revolution".

For the new bike, BH has also dropped the seatstays, which should improve compliance

When it came to aerodynamics, BH used much of what it had learned with its pro level G7, and says it further modified the tube shapes not only to make the frame more slippery to the wind but also to handle the forces of rim brakes — an interesting point to make given it's usually the other way around.

The frame uses a monocoque construction and a mix of Toray T80 and T50 fibres to balance rigidity and weight. BH has also employed its internal compaction techniques to achieve uniform tube thickness, remove any excess material and to eliminate bubbles, imperfections and the like in the carbon.

Claimed to weigh 810g, it’s not the lightest frameset out there, but it’s still respectable.

Sloping geometry

BH has employed the same sloping geometry as the G6 Pro, which in a size medium sees a 557mm top tube, 73-degree head angle, 72.5-degree seat angle and 402mm chainstays.

When we reviewed the BH G6 Pro we found it to be a bike that didn’t like to dawdle, and with the same measurements all around we’d guess the new updated frame will continue that pedigree.

For the new bike, BH has also dropped the seatstays, which should improve compliance a bit, and it's also moved the rear direct mount brake from underneath the bottom bracket back to the standard seatstay mount — a good move in our book.

The new frame sees an internal cable guide system that’s said to offer max protection and reliability for both electronic drivetrains, and is said to make replacements very easy, too.

BH has also added a new patented clip system inside its uncut seatmast/seatpost to accommodate the internal Di2 battery.

The new G7 Pro will be available in five sizes, and pricing is to be announced

BH G7 Pro models

G7 Pro Dura Ace Di2

BH G7 Pro Dura-Ace
BH G7 Pro Dura-Ace

  • Drivetrain: Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 R9170
  • Crank: FSA K-Force 386 4B 52/36
  • Bars: BH Evo Wing
  • Stem: BH Evo
  • Wheels: Vision Metron 55
  • Saddle: Prologo Zero II

G7 Pro Ultegra Di2

BH G7 Pro Ultegra Di2
BH G7 Pro Ultegra Di2

  • Drivetrain: Shimano Ultegra Di2 R8020
  • Crank: FSA SL-K 4B 52/36
  • Bars: BH Super Lite
  • Stem: BH Super Lite
  • Wheels: BH Evo 50
  • Saddle: Prologo Zero II

G7 Pro Ultegra

BH G7 Pro Ultegra
BH G7 Pro Ultegra

  • Drivetrain: Shimano Ultegra R8000
  • Crank: Rotor 3DF 50/34
  • Bars: BH Super Lite
  • Stem: BH Super Lite
  • Wheels: Vision Trimax 35
  • Saddle: Prologo Kappa
Colin Levitch

Staff Writer, Australia
Originally from Denver, Colorado, Colin now resides in Sydney, Australia. Holding a media degree, Colin is focused on the adventure sport media world. Coming from a ski background, his former European pro father convinced him to try collegiate crit racing. Although his bright socks say full roadie, he enjoys the occasional mountain bike ride, too.
  • Discipline: Road, mountain
  • Preferred Terrain: Tarmac mountain climbs into snow-covered hills
  • Current Bikes: BMC TeamMachine SLR01, Trek Top Fuel 9
  • Dream Bike: Mosaic Cycles RT-1
  • Beer of Choice: New Belgium La Folie
  • Location: Sydney, Australia

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