Diamondback Podium refined for 2016

Stiffer and more aero than before, without integrated brakes or stem

For 2016, Diamondback went back to the CAD drawing board to refine its flagship aero race bike, the Podium. Taking shaping cues from the brand's time-trial bike, Diamondback lowered the drag on the Podium a claimed 100g over last year's model. The brand also beefed up the torsional stiffness with a stockier bottom-bracket shell and down tube.

While better known for the BMX bikes the firm started with in the ’70s and, more recently, its mountain bikes, Diamondback made a push into road with the launch of the Podium in 2013. 

BikeRadar's James Huang reviewed the 2013 Podium Equipe and found it comfortable but a bit lacking in front-end stiffness. Diamondback has addressed the stiffness concerns, as well as fine-tuning some aero details with the 2016 model.

Aero bikes are increasingly segmenting into two camps: those that use integrated, often-proprietary components such as brakes, handlebars and stems for all-out aerodynamic benefit, and those that opt for compatibility with standard equipment. The Podium falls into the latter category, with Diamondback arguing that a rider's preference of equipment and adjustment trumps small aero gains. That said, the new Podium is still faster in the wind tunnel than the last iteration, the company claims. 

Diamondback designers applied many lessons they learned with the company's serios tt bike : diamondback designers applied many lessons they learned with the company's serios tt bike
Diamondback designers applied many lessons they learned with the company's serios tt bike : diamondback designers applied many lessons they learned with the company's serios tt bike

The massive down tube adds to front-end stiffness with an aero design modified from Diamondback's Serios time-trial frame

Also, in part because of feedback from Team Optum, which Diamondback sponsors, the seatpost was kept at a standard 27.2mm for its more comfortable ride versus an aggressively aero-shaped option.

Lateral stiffness has been ratcheted up without adding weight. The new bike is 20 percent laterally stiffer at the bottom bracket area now, according to Diamondback. 

For 2016, Diamondback is offering the top-level Podium Equipe shown here (US$7,500), the Vitesse (US$4,500) with Shimano Ultegra, and the 105-equipped E'Tape (US$2,700). UK and Australian pricing wasn't available at the time of writing.

Click through the gallery above for a detailed look at the 2016 Diamondback Podium Equipe.

Ben Delaney

US Editor-in-Chief
Ben has been writing about bikes since 2000, covering everything from the Tour de France to Asian manufacturing to kids' bikes. The former editor-in-chief of VeloNews, he began racing in college while getting a journalism degree at the University of New Mexico. Based in the cycling-crazed city of Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two kids, Ben enjoys riding most every day.
  • Discipline: Road (paved or otherwise), cyclocross and sometimes mountain. His tri-curious phase seems to have passed, thankfully
  • Preferred Terrain: Quiet mountain roads leading to places unknown
  • Current Bikes: Scott Foil Team Issue, Specialized S-Works Tarmac, Priority Eight city bike... and a constant rotation of test bikes
  • Dream Bike: A BMC Teammachine SLR01 with disc brakes and clearance for 30mm tires (doesn't yet exist)
  • Beer of Choice: Saison Dupont
  • Location: Boulder, CO, USA

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