Always ride with your phone? New Wahoo Elemnt Mini might be your computer

$99 / £79 computer captures ride basics and uploads to Strava

Many riders use their phone for Strava while riding. Other prefer a small bike computer for keeping track of the basics like speed, distance and time. Wahoo's new Elemnt Mini combines the two, with a small computer that leverages the rider's phone for GPS data, wireless ride uploads and text and call alerts. In many ways the Elemnt Mini is an updated version of Wahoo's original bike computer, the Reflkt, which essentially acted as a handlebar-mounted monitor for a smartphone bike computer app. 

Wahoo Elemnt Mini highlights

  • $99 / £79
  • 31.2g / 1.1oz (claimed)
  • 45.7mm diagonal screen size
  • 41x58.4x17mm body size
  • three data fields customizable via an app
  • claimed 300 hours of ride time 
  • without phone: speed, time and distance shown
  • with phone: data above plus text/call alerts, GPS tracking and ride uploads
The Elemnt Mini has a 45.7mm (diagonal) screen. The unit itself is 41 by 58.4mm, and 17mm thick
The Elemnt Mini has a 45.7mm (diagonal) screen. The unit itself is 41 by 58.4mm, and 17mm thick

Two ways to use it

The Elemnt Mini ships with a speed sensor and a stem mount. When used without a phone, the Elemnt Mini pulls data from the speed sensor for speed, time and distance information. If you use Wahoo's cadence or heart-rate sensors, you can get that data, too. Somewhat surprisingly, the Elemnt Mini does not work with non-Wahoo sensors. 

Used without a phone, the Elemnt Mini isn't a good deal, as Sigma, Lezyne, CatEye and others offer basic computers with more features for less money.

Used with a phone (iPhone 4s / Android 4.3 or newer), the Elemnt Mini can do a few more things, like show you incoming text and call information, upload rides wirelessly to Strava, and offer GPS Live Tracking so others can see where you are.

 As with other Wahoo computers, the Elemnt Mini is configured via a smartphone app. 

While the Elemnt is a full-function standalone computer, the Elemnt Mini requires a paired smartphone for full capability
While the Elemnt is a full-function standalone computer, the Elemnt Mini requires a paired smartphone for full capability

Elemnt Mini vs Lezyne Mini GPS and Garmin Edge 25

At $99 / £79, the Elemnt Mini is a direct competitor price-wise to the Lezyne Mini GPS, which offers more features, and the more expensive but micro-sized Garmin Edge 25 ($170 / £140).

On paper, the Lezyne Mini clearly has the most features of the bunch, offering turn-by-turn navigation, Strava Segment, battery life indicators for paired peripherals, breadcrumb GPS and power data (with a paired meter) in addition to the basic metrics that the Elemnt Mini and the Edge 25 offer.

Like the Elemnt Mini, the Lezyne Mini GPS also shows incoming calls and texts, and can upload to sites like Strava via the computer's dedicated app.

The Garmin Edge 25 is smaller (40x42mm) and lighter (25g / 0.90z) than the Elemnt Mini, but considerably more expensive. The Edge 25 offers navigation from preloaded courses, plus breadcrumb trails and the ability to compete against your previous best time on a given course. 

 Garmin also has the Edge 20, which is closer in price to the two Mini computers, but that does not have Bluetooth or ANT+, so there is no connecting to your phone or peripheral sensors.

BikeRadar will be testing and reviewing an Elemnt Mini soon.

The Wahoo Elemnt Mini shows three data lines plus the time, and weighs a claimed 31.2g / 1.1oz
The Wahoo Elemnt Mini shows three data lines plus the time, and weighs a claimed 31.2g / 1.1oz

Ben Delaney

US Editor-in-Chief
Ben has been writing about bikes since 2000, covering everything from the Tour de France to Asian manufacturing to kids' bikes. The former editor-in-chief of VeloNews, he began racing in college while getting a journalism degree at the University of New Mexico. Based in the cycling-crazed city of Boulder, Colorado, with his wife and two kids, Ben enjoys riding most every day.
  • Discipline: Road (paved or otherwise), cyclocross and sometimes mountain. His tri-curious phase seems to have passed, thankfully
  • Preferred Terrain: Quiet mountain roads leading to places unknown
  • Current Bikes: Scott Foil Team Issue, Specialized S-Works Tarmac, Priority Eight city bike... and a constant rotation of test bikes
  • Dream Bike: A BMC Teammachine SLR01 with disc brakes and clearance for 30mm tires (doesn't yet exist)
  • Beer of Choice: Saison Dupont
  • Location: Boulder, CO, USA

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