Easton EC90 Equipe SLX ergo bars£169.99

Choosing the right handlebar for the job is a personal thing. Although many drop bars have anatomic bends that are interrupted by straight sections to provide a more natural resting place for your palms, those with a traditional curved bend are enjoying a resurgence of interest - particularly among the pro ranks who grew up with them.

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Choosing the right handlebar for the job is a personal thing. Although many drop bars have anatomic bends that are interrupted by straight sections to provide a more natural resting place for your palms, those with a traditional curved bend are enjoying a resurgence of interest - particularly among the pro ranks who grew up with them.


These Easton anatomic bars are well made, and the use of so-called nanotechnology in their production means the structure is about as tough as it gets, so they're more likely to resist failure than other carbon bars in the event of an accident.

The tubing profile provides a slightly greater surface area for the hands to rest upon than a round tube, and the cutaway section at the top corner provides enough clearance for the wrists when sprinting on the drops, though some riders commented that they prefer handlebars with a flat section on the top.

The Equipe SLX ergo bar is claimed to be the 'stiffest, lightest bars available'and while they are indeed around 20 per cent stiffer than aluminium bars of a similar weight, we feel they would be a bit out of place on anything less than a cost-no-object 'superbike'. After all, aluminium bars such as the Syntace Race continue to be available at around a third of the price.The cheaper Equipe version is available in a non-ergo bend, Equipe Pro.

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