DT Swiss debuts ultralight sub-1,500g OPM O.D.L. Race suspension fork

Revamped Mon Chasseral carbon clincher road climbing wheels, too

At this year's Sea Otter Classic, DT Swiss showed off an ultralight version of the current OPM O.D.L. suspension fork. Aptly named the OPM O.D.L. Race, the new fork gets a slick carbon fibre crown and steerer tube that brings the total claimed down to a staggering 1,480g (3.26lb) for a 100mm-travel 29er modelincluding the 100x15mm thru-axle – making it more than 100g lighter than a RockShox SID World Cup.

Unlike carbon fibre upper assemblies from other companies, DT Swiss isn’t making the crown and steerer as a single unit. Instead, DT Swiss moulds them separately and then bonds them together. DT Swiss has a novel construction method for the crown called Tailored Fiber Process, where carbon fibres are mechanically embroidered onto a substrate before it’s all cooked in a mould. According to DT Swiss, this makes for more consistent parts than when individual swatches are placed by hand.

The base of the steerer tube is molded directly into the crown but the main shaft is actually a separate piece thatõs formed separately and then bonded into place: the base of the steerer tube is molded directly into the crown but the main shaft is actually a separate piece thatõs formed separately and then bonded into place
The base of the steerer tube is molded directly into the crown but the main shaft is actually a separate piece thatõs formed separately and then bonded into place: the base of the steerer tube is molded directly into the crown but the main shaft is actually a separate piece thatõs formed separately and then bonded into place

The unique texture comes from DT Swiss' proprietary TFP moulding process

DT Swiss’ carbon fibre upper assembly also differs from some of its competitors in that the crown and steerer aren’t actually moulded as a single unit but rather formed separately and then bonded together after the curing process. Regardless, the switch to composite construction certainly saves a lot of weight, dropped 120g over the aluminium parts on the standard OPM O.D.L. fork.

Also featured on the OPM O.D.L. Race fork are new seals developed in cooperation with SKF, which use the usual spring-tensioned lips to keep oil inside but a sharper, spring-free wiper that DT Swiss says does a better job of scraping crud off the stanchions.

DT swiss's latest cast magnesium lower legs feature stout arches with very deep webbed trusses. it certainly looks like a stiff structure: dt swiss's latest cast magnesium lower legs feature stout arches with very deep webbed trusses. it certainly looks like a stiff structure
DT swiss's latest cast magnesium lower legs feature stout arches with very deep webbed trusses. it certainly looks like a stiff structure: dt swiss's latest cast magnesium lower legs feature stout arches with very deep webbed trusses. it certainly looks like a stiff structure

The burly-looking magnesium lower legs are fitted with new seals from SKF 

Carrying over from the standard OPM O.D.L. fork is the remotely operated, three-position, compression damper. Like Fox’s CTD arrangement, the DT Swiss fork can be set in Open, Drive and Lock modes to suit the task at hand.

DT Swiss will offer the new fork in 27.5in and 29in wheel sizes, both in 100mm or 120mm travel configurations. The first 300 samples will also get limited-edition team-replica graphics and special green fork seals (a nod to SKF Racing’s trademark hue in motorsports racing). As expected, retail price is on the premium side at a whopping US$1,300.

The remotely operated compression damper features three positions: open, drive, and lock: the remotely operated compression damper features three positions: open, drive, and lock
The remotely operated compression damper features three positions: open, drive, and lock: the remotely operated compression damper features three positions: open, drive, and lock

Carrying over from the standard OPM O.D.L. fork is the three-position compression damper, which in concept is similar to the Fox CTD system

New Mon Chasseral carbon clincher climbing wheels

Also new from DT Swiss is the relaunch of the company’s old Mon Chasseral road bike climbing wheels. Whereas the original Mon Chasserals were somewhat underwhelming with their aluminium clincher rims and middling 1,450g weight, these new ones are unquestionably feathery at around 1,150g – and that’s still with a clincher rim, not a more restrictive tubular.

Another debut from dt swiss are the new mon chasseral road wheels, which despite being carbon clinchers still post an ultralight claimed weight of around 1,150g per pair: another debut from dt swiss are the new mon chasseral road wheels, which despite being carbon clinchers still post an ultralight claimed weight of around 1,150g per pair
Another debut from dt swiss are the new mon chasseral road wheels, which despite being carbon clinchers still post an ultralight claimed weight of around 1,150g per pair: another debut from dt swiss are the new mon chasseral road wheels, which despite being carbon clinchers still post an ultralight claimed weight of around 1,150g per pair

At just 1,250g per set, this person's arms aren't going to get tired any time soon

The new Mon Chasserals borrow the rims from the DT Swiss RC 28 Spline C, carrying over the same 28mm depth, 15mm internal width, and tubeless compatibility. The Mon Chasserals shed more than 100g from the RC 28 Spline C with slick carbon fibre front and rear hubs, however, plus milled-out star ratchet drive rings and hybrid ceramic bearing cartridges.

Both hubs feature hybrid ceramic bearings and dt swiss' lower-weight star ratchet drivers: both hubs feature hybrid ceramic bearings and dt swiss' lower-weight star ratchet drivers
Both hubs feature hybrid ceramic bearings and dt swiss' lower-weight star ratchet drivers: both hubs feature hybrid ceramic bearings and dt swiss' lower-weight star ratchet drivers

Mmm, carbon

Retail price for the Mon Chasserals is still to be determined, but ‘expensive’ is a safe bet. DT Swiss expects them to land in stores around July or August.

For more information, visit www.dtswiss.com.

James Huang

Former Technical Editor, US
James was BikeRadar's US tech editor from 2007-2015.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Up in the Colorado high-country where the singletrack is still single, the dirt is still brown, and the aspens are in full bloom. Also, those perfect stretches of pavement where the road snakes across the mountainside like an artist's paintbrush.
  • Beer of Choice: Mexican Coke
  • Location: Boulder, CO, USA

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