Scott gets into fat bike game with Big Ed

Alloy frame, 80mm rims and RockShox Bluto suspension fork

Scott Sports is the latest mainstream brand to dive into the fat bike market with the new Big Ed. While the bike doesn't look to break any new ground, it looks like a capable contender in what is fast becoming a very crowded field.

The Big Ed's alloy frame borrows several design cues from Scott's standard upper-end alloy hardtails, including hydroformed tubing, a tapered front end, and deep-profile, forged, quick-release rear dropouts. A forged driveside, forward chainstay stub creates some extra clearance for the chainrings and rear tyre, too (although the widely spaced seatstays leave little room for your heels).

As with many other Scott frames, the Big Ed uses an extra-wide press-fit bottom bracket shell, which in this case measures 121mm across to replicate the standard 100mm-wide threaded bearing layout for fat bikes.

Check out more of our Scott 2015 coverage.

A forged piece lends a little extra tire and chainring clearance as compared to a bent tube: a forged piece lends a little extra tire and chainring clearance as compared to a bent tube
A forged piece lends a little extra tire and chainring clearance as compared to a bent tube: a forged piece lends a little extra tire and chainring clearance as compared to a bent tube

The extra-wide bottom bracket shell creates a little more room for the rear tire

Other frame features include externally routed, full-length cable housing for easy servicing, a chain stay-mounted rear brake calliper (sized for a 160mm rotor), and clearance for 4.00in-wide tyres mounted on 80mm-wide rims.

The workhorse build comprises a SRAM X9 2x10 transmission, Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, Syncros single-wall aluminium rims and cartridge bearing hubs, and an e13 TRS aluminium crankset. One key highlight, however, is the RockShox Bluto fork. While some may question the need for suspension on a bike with 4in balloon feet, keep in mind that that movement is wholly undamped so the Bluto should yield a big boost in control.

Relatively fast-rolling kenda tires and a rockshox bluto fork should make for excellent traction and control: relatively fast-rolling kenda tires and a rockshox bluto fork should make for excellent traction and control
Relatively fast-rolling kenda tires and a rockshox bluto fork should make for excellent traction and control: relatively fast-rolling kenda tires and a rockshox bluto fork should make for excellent traction and control

The RockShox Bluto fork and 4in-wide Kenda tyres should provide plenty of cushioning

Final pricing and availability is still to be announced but actual weight for a medium sample without pedals is about 15.5kg / 34lb.

James Huang

Technical Editor, US
James started as a roadie in 1990 with his high school team but switched to dirt in 1994 and has enjoyed both ever since. Anything that comes through his hands is bound to be taken apart, and those hands still sometimes smell like fork oil even though he retired from shop life in 2007. He prefers manual over automatic, fizzy over still, and the right way over the easy way.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road, cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Up in the Colorado high-country where the singletrack is still single, the dirt is still brown, and the aspens are in full bloom. Also, those perfect stretches of pavement where the road snakes across the mountainside like an artist's paintbrush.
  • Beer of Choice: Mexican Coke
  • Location: Boulder, Colorado, USA

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