The new and improved BMC Teammachine ALR

BMC’s premier bike loses weight and gains performance

Hot on the heels of BMC's aluminium Roadmachine X comes the improved aluminium-framed Teammachine ALR.

Said to be a Teammachine for all (and BMC’s most advanced aluminium frame yet), there are three new models, two with rim brakes and one with discs. And BMC says they are all 100 percent based on the DNA of the latest Teammachine SLR01.

BMC’s goal was to create a gateway into the Teammachine family, offering a high-performance aluminium frame from a premium brand with all-day race compliance, and the same feeling as its carbon cousin. 

Designed to be truly competitive on a budget, the ALR should be at home scaling mountains, road racing or racking up the training miles.

The new size-specific, triple-butted, hydro-formed aluminium tubes feature eight different profiles, all designed for optimum performance in each area. Each is smooth welded for clean looks.

Tidy internal cabling through the down tube and smooth welds
Tidy internal cabling through the down tube and smooth welds

BMC’s TCC (Tuned Compliance Concept) Race performance-led design system results in the characteristically flattened and dropped seatstays, D-shaped seatpost and ACE Technology Premium carbon fork, all designed to flex in key areas for improved traction and handling, and to reduce road vibration. The resulting frame bears a close resemblance to the carbon-fibre SLR01, showcasing its genes.

The seat clamp is integrated within the top tube/seat tube junction, with its bolt accessed from beneath — and by removing any seat tube extension above the top tube, there’s more exposed seatpost to flex and create more comfort.

The head tube shares the SLR01's tapered top
The head tube shares the SLR01's tapered top

 Internal cable routing through the down tube via alloy ports is said to be weatherproof and rattle free.

Stefan Christ, BMC’s head of R&D said: “We consider the Teammachine ALR as an access point to performance road riding. Aluminium technology has progressed in recent years and we now have the possibility to recreate the shape of the Teammachine SLR with aluminium. It’s a lightweight and stiff material, and the Teammachine ALR is complemented by core carbon components.”

BMC Teammachine ALR performance and kit

The hidden seatpost clamp bolt is tucked away under the top tube
The hidden seatpost clamp bolt is tucked away under the top tube

The new models will be available in five sizes: 47, 51, 54, 57 and 60cm. Each benefits from high-spec carbon components from their pre-existing siblings, with all models gaining a Teammachine SLR02 carbon fork, including the ALR rim brake and disc-brake frameset options. 

That’s matched by the SLR02 D-shaped carbon seatpost, weighing just 195g. Claimed frame weight for a 54cm painted frame with mech hanger is 1,250g for the ALR Disc or 1,165g for the ALR. Fork weights are claimed to be 405g and 375g respectively. The ALR Disc has BMC’s own Ultra Light thru-axles too.

The ALR One gets an all-105 compact drivetrain
The ALR One gets an all-105 compact drivetrain

Components for the lowest priced ALR Two centre on a compact Shimano Tiagra groupset, Shimano-hubbed Mavic CXP rims and BMC finishing kit. The ALR One has Shimano 105 compact gearing, the same Shimano/Mavic wheelset, Vittoria Zaffiro Pro Slick 25mm tyres and BMC finishing kit. 

Heading the line-up is the ALR Disc One with its Shimano 105 compact, hydraulic-disc groupset, Shimano RS-170 disc wheelset, Vittorias and BMC finishing kit.

The seatstays are flattened but wide to improve vertical compliance without reducing lateral stiffness
The seatstays are flattened but wide to improve vertical compliance without reducing lateral stiffness
 

Although I couldn’t test ride the ALR during the launch, the 54cm models (as shown in the photographs) weighed as follows: ALR Two 9.03kg, ALR One 8.87kg, ALR Disc one 8.97kg (although this bike wasn’t built in final production spec).

Although supplied with 25mm tyres, there’s clearance for 28mm rubber, expanding the ALR’s versatility, but in keeping with the bike’s intentions, there’s no provision to mount mudguards.

Although this pre-production bike was built with Ultegra hydraulic levers, the ALR Disc One will come with 105 hydraulic units
Although this pre-production bike was built with Ultegra hydraulic levers, the ALR Disc One will come with 105 hydraulic units

Compared to the Teammachine SLR01, the ALR has 10mm additional stack height for comfort, but the same head tube and seat tube angles, chainstay length and bottom-bracket drop. When comparing the test performance of both bikes, BMC says its bottom-bracket stiffness (acceleration) is near identical, and only a fraction less for the ALR. 

Likewise with the head-tube stiffness, which was slightly sacrificed on the ALR to maintain BMC’s preferred weight target. The rear triangle is also similarly stiff, just less than SLR01, but the new ALR’s greatest area of improvement over the old model is compliance, which should all add up to the stated aim of keeping riders feeling fresher for longer, while still being fast.

Internal hose routing for the front brake and Shimano's RS-170 wheelset
Internal hose routing for the front brake and Shimano's RS-170 wheelset

Bikes are due in stores in September, and current pricing is in euro or Swiss francs for the complete bikes. We will update you with UK, US and Australian prices when they become available.

BMC Teammachine ALR01 pricing and availability

  • BMC Teammachine ALR01 Disc One: £1,800 / $2,199 / €1,999 / CHF2,199
  • BMC Teammachine ALR01 One: £TBC / $1,599 / €1,499 / CHF1,699
  • BMC Teammachine ALR01 Two: £TBC / $1,399 / €1,299 / CHF1,399
Robin Wilmott

Tech Writer, Tech Hub, UK,
Robin began road cycling in 1988, and with mountain bikes in their infancy, mixed experimental off-road adventures with club time trials and road races. Cyclocross soon became a winter staple, and has remained his favourite form of competition. Robin has always loved the technical aspect of building and maintaining bikes, and several years working in a good bike shop only amplified that. Ten years as a Forensic Photographer followed, honing his eye for detail in pictures and words. He has shot at the biggest pro events since the '90s, and now he's here, drawing on all those experiences to figure out what makes a bike or component tick.
  • Discipline: Road, cyclocross, time trials
  • Beer of Choice: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

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