This could just be the ultimate N+1 bike

Coast’s Buzzraw is ridiculously good fun

We first saw Coast bikes' Buzzraw and Quinn at last year’s Taipei bike show. At this year's show I finally got to take both of these crazy-looking fat-tyred urban wonders out for a spin.

Coast was formed back in 2012 in the company’s native Singapore. The original concept was to create bikes that are built for carrying and commuting with a bit more of a stylish edge than your average about-town machine.

Let's start with the Quinn. In its raw form, the Quinn’s simple lines hide a multitude of add-ons and accessories to create a tough little urban machine. It’s by far Coast’s most ‘normal’ bike with its fat-tyred 20” wheels and disc brakes.

Coast's Quinn looks suitably out there, and this is its more conservative offering
Coast's Quinn looks suitably out there, and this is its more conservative offering

The main frame’s twin top tube creates a nicely sized slot for a bag and the twin downtube is bridged with a wooden insert to keep your bag dry and free of spray from those fat tyres.

The ride is one that’ll put a smile on your face, as those fat tyres encourage you to chuck the Quinn into corners while the big volume smoothness eats up rough roads and can take a bit of curb jumping abuse with it.

Coast’s Tony Tan explains that rather than make an ever-extending range they’ve left the frame adaptable to run a multitude of drivetrain options and pedal-assistance.

We found the Pinion's shifting to be sweet and swift especially when compared to a standard hub-gear setup
We found the Pinion's shifting to be sweet and swift especially when compared to a standard hub-gear setup

The base model Quinn comes with a Gates CDN belt driving a single speed rear wheel. Second up is a Shimano Nexus 3-spd hub, with the second option (which we tried) running a Gates belt through a BB-mounted Pinion 6 speed.

The Pinion drive is impressively smooth and far quicker than a hub-gear to switch between ratios.

Describing a bike like the Quinn as the normal option of these two bikes just shows quite how differently Coast looks at urban bike design.

The Quinn's twin top tube and braced twin downtubes leave a handy space to store a bag, hence the bungee cords to keep your luggage in place
The Quinn's twin top tube and braced twin downtubes leave a handy space to store a bag, hence the bungee cords to keep your luggage in place

The second bike we took for a spin is the frankly mad-looking Buzzraw, which looks like a mash-up of a Honda monkey bike, fat-bike and a classic Schwinn Orange crate, or Raleigh Chopper.

The Buzzraw is a bike that just made me smile the minute I got on it. The super-wide treaded balloon tyres roll over anything with ease, and the long bench seat offers ample room for carrying a passenger.

Big wide bars flow out of the triple crown fork setup for that full-on easy rider experience
Big wide bars flow out of the triple crown fork setup for that full-on easy rider experience

The model I tested was the e250W pedal assist version and scooting around the Taipei show’s road test loop spinning the pedals laid back style at 30kph just leaves you laughing.

180mm rotors on a 20inch wheel. Overkill maybe, but they do look good
180mm rotors on a 20inch wheel. Overkill maybe, but they do look good

The bike is just a massive amount of fun to ride, as in you can’t ride it without a smile on your face. This much fun should be illegal (and in the case of the 1000w model probably is) and we really like Coast’s approach to dispel any thoughts of dour and boring city bikes.

The Bafang head unit displays speed, combined Wattage (motor and you) battery level and distance, should you want to put some training miles in on it…
The Bafang head unit displays speed, combined Wattage (motor and you) battery level and distance, should you want to put some training miles in on it…

The Buzzraw comes in a multitude of options, from the entry level X4 8 speed at $999, to the e250w tester we tried at $1,979 without batter), and $2,345 with battery shipped with it.

Now that’s a seat that'll easily fit a passenger or two…
Now that’s a seat that'll easily fit a passenger or two…

Then there’s a frankly mental e1000w assisted version which Tony happily informs us is good for 60kph plus, which we’d love to give a try. The dubious legality of the 1000w version in the UK/US aside the $3,498 price tag (or $2,788 without a battery) would still give plenty of fun.

With the bench-like seat there's not much chance of a rider's stripe up your back but the full guards will make doubly sure you stay dry
With the bench-like seat there's not much chance of a rider's stripe up your back but the full guards will make doubly sure you stay dry

The Buzzraw is a bike that I have absolutely no need for, but I seriously want one. Isn’t that the very definition of the N+1 bike?

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