Malvern Star brand reborn into the past for 2016

Heritage Range is new direction for historic brand

As one of the world’s oldest bike brands, Malvern Star is an iconic part of Australian cycling. However, recent years have seen the brand struggle for identify in a rapidly changing market. For 2016, this is all set to change, with Malvern Star looking to its past with a classic and quality ‘Heritage Range’ that joins the brand’s lifestyle and children’s bikes.

Below we take a look at some of the new range highlights.

Oppy S

Named after australian pioneering cyclist hubert opperman, the oppy name continues for 2016: named after australian pioneering cyclist hubert opperman, the oppy name continues for 2016
Named after australian pioneering cyclist hubert opperman, the oppy name continues for 2016: named after australian pioneering cyclist hubert opperman, the oppy name continues for 2016

Named after Australian pioneering cyclist Hubert Opperman, the Oppy name continues for 2016

Perhaps the most exciting model to join the Malvern Star range is the Oppy S. Gone is the carbon – this versatile gravel bike combines classic steel style with modern features such as disc brakes and Shimano road shifting. While not light, the bike should fit well with the growing number of riders seeking to go more places with their road bikes.

Plenty of tyre clearance for this versatile 'gravel' bike:
Plenty of tyre clearance for this versatile 'gravel' bike:

Plenty of clearance for fenders and big rubber

The 700c Cro-Moly steel frame features double-butted tubing and a lugged fork. There’s clearance for up to 40c tyres (35c stock). Mounts for fenders and loaded racks are given front and rear.

There are just two models in the range. The more expensive Oppy S2 (AU$1,700) will feature Shimano 105 22-speed shifting with matched hydraulic disc brakes.

The gearing range is well suited to loaded touring, with a compact crank up front matched to an 11-32T cassette at rear. Tubeless-ready, 32-hole Alex rims sit laced to Shimano disc hubs. Lastly, leather bar tape and saddle add further retro touches.

Sitting at a lower price is the malvern star oppy s1 :
Sitting at a lower price is the malvern star oppy s1 :

The Malvern Star Oppy S1

If the Oppy S2 is too much, the S1 (AU$1,000) keeps the same frame, but moves to base level Shimano Claris 16-speed shifting. This gearing maintains the same range as the S2. 

The S1’s braking duties are handled by Promax mechanical disc calipers, while cheaper 32-hole Alex rims are featured.

Porter and Vogue 

At first we walked past these new men’s and women’s models without much of a glimpse, but were encouraged to lift one up. These aren’t the steel clunkers they appear to be, but rather classically inspired rides made from lightweight aluminium frames, with matching aluminium racks and Bamboo fenders. The fit is upright and designed for leisurely riding around town.

Where the ladies have the vogue, the men get the porter. the malvern star porter 2 is a whole lot lighter than it looks:
Where the ladies have the vogue, the men get the porter. the malvern star porter 2 is a whole lot lighter than it looks:

Porter 2 (beer not included)

For the men, the Porter is based on the Porteur style delivery bikes of the past. Selling at AU$1,000, the Porter 2 (pictured) offers an 8-speed Shimano Nexus internal geared hub, 38c tyres and a leather touring saddle.

For a little less (AU$800), the Porter 1 offers 7-speed Shimano Altus derailleur shifting. Both Porter models include the front rack, front rack bag, center kickstand and bamboo fenders.

The ladies malvern star vogue 2 is ready for urban riding. it's also available in a green :
The ladies malvern star vogue 2 is ready for urban riding. it's also available in a green :

Malvern Star Vogue 2

For the ladies there's the Vogue with a classically flowing frame. Both the Vogue 2 and Vogue 1 are priced equal to the men’s Porters and share similar component specifications. In addition to the accessories given with the men’s rides, the Vogue includes a matching rear rack too.

On all four bikes, the spring-loaded fork is there to stabilise steering and ensure the bike doesn’t flop and fall over when the front basket is heavily weighted and the centre kickstand down.

Path Racer

Perhaps not going to be as popular as the porter range, the path racer is inspired by malvern star racers of the 30s and 40s :
Perhaps not going to be as popular as the porter range, the path racer is inspired by malvern star racers of the 30s and 40s :

First seen last year, this old school flat track racer is a large contributing start to the new Heritage Range. For 2016, things don’t change a whole lot and the raked out front fork and moustache bars remain.

Pictured above is the Path Racer 2 (AU$900), which features a Sturmey Archer (yep, they still exist) 2-speed Kickshifter – simply kick backwards to shift.

This ride surely isn’t for everyone, but owners of moustache wax will likely be in delight.

For closer details of the new models, check out the gallery up top.

David Rome

Editor, Australia
Having worked full-time within the cycling industry since 2006, Dave is a former editor of BikeRadar Australia. Riding and racing mountain, road and 'cross for over a decade, Dave's passion lies in the sport's technical aspects, and his tool collection is a true sign of that.
  • Discipline: Mountain, road and cyclocross
  • Preferred Terrain: Fast and flowing singletrack with the occasional air is the dream. Also happy chasing tarmac bends.
  • Current Bikes: Trek Fuel EX 27.5, SwiftCarbon Detritovore, Salsa Chilli Con Crosso
  • Dream Bike: Custom Independent Fabrications titanium, SRAM Etap and Enve wheels/cockpit
  • Beer of Choice: Gin & tonic
  • Location: Sydney, Australia

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